Acupuncture, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Chinese Medicine, Natural Transition, and the Gender Binary

Chinese Medicine, Natural Transition, and the Gender Binary. A guest post on Tynan Rhea’s website (founder of postpartumsex.com).

A few excerpts:

Yin and yang are often associated with female and male energy respectively, which leads to the misconception that Chinese Medicine is inherently binary and therefore inappropriate for trans medicine. It is true that most diagnoses in Chinese medicine refer to the interaction between opposites: hot and cold, internal and external, excess and deficient, yin and yang, among others. However, yin and yang, though often associated with male and female energy, are more accurately represented by masculine and feminine.

The great thing about Chinese Medicine is that we always work from a constitutional root. We look at the person’s tongue and feel their pulse to identify the root of a person’s pattern and work on that as well as the symptoms. The goal is always to bring the patient into alignment with their constitution, not to change them based on societal expectations of their sex and what their hormone profile will look like.

I see many trans men pre-testosterone present as yang (testosterone) deficient and many trans women pre-estrogen present as yin (estrogen/progesterone) deficient. Treatment in this case affirms their identity and assists their transition. Once folks have been on hormones for a while, sometimes testosterone depletes yin and spironolactone (a testosterone-blocker) depletes yang. In this case, it is appropriate to tonify the depleted energy to bring the person back into balance. This does not in any way counteract their transition, it gently balances and keeps them healthy and aligned with their constitutions. Similarly, an intersex person with yin deficiency would be treated differently than an intersex person with yang deficiency, regardless of their chromosomes or type of intersex diagnosis.

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All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


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Acupuncture, Press, Prism Blog

Spotlight with BCA Clinic

July Practitioner Spotlight with Katrina Hanson

My favorite part of my job is watching people regain ownership of their healing process, reconnect with their bodies, and make positive changes in their lives.

I came to acupuncture through a love of herbal medicine, sparked by my botanist father who taught me a deep appreciation for plants. On road trips growing up, he’d suddenly pull over to the side of the road, jump out of the car, and sprint up a hill to a tiny rare flower that he somehow spotted while driving… Click to keep reading!


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

Acupuncture, For Providers, Press, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Acupuncture and Trans Medicine

Just a little throwback to this video about my gender-inclusivity activism at my alma mater, the Acupuncture and Integrative Medicine College (AIMC) Berkeley. It’s so wonderful to reflect on how much my practice and my knowledge has evolved; all with the support of my wonderful patients. This has been a long process and I’m looking forward to continuing the journey with all of you!


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

Acupuncture, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Herbs as Transition Alternative for Trans Kids and Teens

Growing up is always eventful and often tumultuous. For trans and gender non-conforming kids and teens, the stress and chaos can be magnified. Many studies have shown the importance of allowing trans kids to express their identities; it greatly reduces their suicide risk and imroves their lifetime mental and physical health. However, it can be difficult for parents to know how to approach this, especially when so many effects of prescription hormones are irreversible. Prism Integrative Acupuncture provides a safe, supportive space for kids and teens to explore their identies and start the process of transitioning in a mild and natural way, while allowing parents time to adjust to these changes. For gender non-conforming or gender variant kids who may not want to transition, this can be an especially important method of exploration. Whether your child is taking hormone blockers, HRT, or nothing at all, acupuncture and herbs can help them feel more comfortable in their bodies and identities while reducing their overall risks and long-term effects. We happily work with MDs, therapists, and other types of healthcare providers to give your child the most well-rounded care possible.

girl-2242668_1920

Acupuncture and herbs may help to:

  • Connect gender creative/non-conforming kids with their bodies to reduce dysphoria
  • Create space to explore identity and gender expression without judgement or irreversible treatments
  • Reduce anxiety surrounding the menstrual cycle
  • Slow a heavy flow, ease cramps, reduce PMS and bloating
  • Prevent spotting between cycles, which can be a side effect of prescription progesterone or testosterone
  • Calm and reduce anxiety and depression, to help improve school attendance rates
  • Together with prescription progesterone, herbs may suppress the menses
  • “Test out” slight hormonal shifts without taking prescription hormones
    • Feminizing herbs may support slight breast growth
    • Masculinizing herbs may support some facial hair growth
    • Herbs can create a “feeling” of hormonal change in the body, which for some people is enough to reduce dysphoria
  • Smooth side effects of prescription hormones or hormone blockers
  • Reduce compression pain, back pain, chest tightness, and skin lesions from binding and gaffing
  • Reduce Acne
  • Reduce fatigue
  • Improve sleep
  • Benefit focus and concentration
  • Reduce stress and soothe anxiety
  • Lift depression
  • Boost your immune system to keep you healthy through the seasons

    All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


    Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

    Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

Acupuncture, Endometriosis, Fertility and Pregnancy, PCOS, Prism Blog, Sex & Relationships, Transgender Wellness

Acupuncture and Herbs for Reproductive Health and Fertility

Western treatments for reproductive health can often be frustrating and come with a lot of side effects. Acupuncture and herbs provide support to these western treatments to reduce side effects and improve success, as well as an alternative to more invasive western treatments. We happily work with MDs, fertility specialists, and other types of providers to provide you with the most well-rounded care possible.

Acupuncture and herbs may help to:

  • Restart the menses in amenorrhea
  • Slow a heavy flow
  • Ease cramps
  • Reduce PMS/PMDD and bloating
  • Prevent spotting between cycles
  • Inspire a more regular cycle
  • Regulate hormones and ease symptoms of PCOS
  • Ease symptoms of endometriosis and fibroids
  • Ease symptoms of fibrocystic breasts
  • Soothe vaginal dryness
  • Reduce pain with sex and increase orgasmic capacity
  • Improve prostate health and reduce swelling and inflammation
  • Increase erectile capacity
  • Improve ovulation frequency
  • Assist with restarting the menstrual cycle and promoting fertility after stopping testosterone
  • Assist with regulating hormones and improving fertility by soothing endocrine and autoimmune disorders, such as Hashimotos
  • Reduce some types of miscarriage risk
  • Ease morning sickness, edema, fatigue, and other symptoms of pregnancy
  • Reduce rates of some presentations of malpositioned fetuses
  • Prepare the body to start labor on time
  • Speed recover post labor or cesarean
  • Benefit lactation and reduce risk of mastitis
  • Soothe anxiety and post-partum depression to improve baby bonding

shutterstock_388058173.jpg


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

Acupuncture, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

The Three-Part Recipe for Natural Transitioning

What does natural transition mean?

In contrast to using prescription hormones and/or surgeries, natural transition usually involves some combination of social transition, presentation transition, herbs, acupuncture, and/or nutrition.

Herbs: Herbs are a desired alternative to HRT for many people who wish to experience only mild changes, rather than the more drastic effects of prescription hormones. Herbs alone may cause slight breast growth (feminizing herbs), or slight facial hair growth (masculinizing herbs). They can also be used to reduce hair loss, ease pain from binding and gaffing, and much more.
For most people, herbs aren’t going to change your hormones drastically alone, so someone might choose to start out taking synthetic hormones and, once they’ve achieved the effect they want, use herbs to lower their dose of synthetic hormones or switch to herbs entirely. Herbs can maintain the hormone levels and characteristics you’ve built up with synthetic hormones. This is a good alternative to the sometimes unpleasant side effects of long-term synthetic hormone use.
Herbs are also great at reducing side effects of prescriptions hormones, like hot flashes, acne, hair loss, vaginal dryness, blood pressure imbalance, edema and bloating, and many other effects.

Acupuncture: Acupuncture is most well known for its effects of reducing pain and speeding healing. It is in fact great for reducing chest tightness, back pain, and skin lesions from binding and gaffing, as well as reducing pain and swelling and speeding healing after surgeries. Acupuncture can also be used to reduce the appearance of scars, including keloid scars, improve circulation to reduce the chance of blood clots and edema, and regulate blood pressure. It also soothes anxiety and depression, improves sleep and digestion, and generally aids your overall well-being.

Nutrition: Foods alone won’t cause notable changes, no matter how strict of a diet you follow. However, certain foods do have the ability to change our hormone profiles, most notably those that are estrogenic. By increasing or decreasing estrogenic foods in your diet, as well as by eating a balanced diet aimed at encouraging detox and flushing out of other hormones, nutrition can be an important part of your transition plan.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

 

Acupuncture, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

20+ Ways Acupuncture Supports Transgender Wellness

Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture have thousands of years of experience in dealing with hot flashes, low libido, erectile dysfunction, vaginal dryness, menstrual spotting, and hair loss, among other symptoms. Many of these treatments can be applied to transgender care, to complement hormone therapy during transition. Additionally, acupuncture has been shown to greatly reduce recovery time from surgery and help with post-surgical problems such as lack of sensation and scarring. Acupuncture and herbs can be used to stimulate hair regrowth, stop uterine spotting, and ease side effects of prescription hormones. We happily work with MDs, surgeons, and other healthcare providers to give you the most well-rounded care possible.

Acupuncture and herbs may help to:

  • Ease menstrual, uterine, post-hysterectomy, and ‘psychosomatic’ cramps
  • Reduce PMS/PMDD and cyclical bloating
  • Reduce spotting and breakthrough bleeding
  • Ease symptoms of endometriosis and fibroids
  • Soothe vaginal dryness and atrophy
  • Ease candida/yeast infections and bacterial vaginosis (BV)
  • Reduce pain with sex and increase orgasmic capacity
  • Improve fertility, and help restore fertility post-T
  • Improve prostate health and reduce swelling and inflammation
  • Increase erectile capacity
  • Balance hormones to soothe ups and downs
  • Speed effects of pharmaceutical hormones
  • Reduce hot flashes and night sweats
  • Reduce post-surgical pain, speed healing, and reduce scarring
  • Reduce compression pain, chest tightness, and skin lesions from binding and gaffing
  • Improve circulation to prevent blood clots
  • Reduce edema and water weight
  • Regulate low and high blood pressure
  • Reduce and restore hair loss
  • Reduce fatigue
  • Improve sleep
  • Benefit memory and concentration
  • Reduce stress and soothe anxiety
  • Lift depression
  • Boost your immune system to keep you healthy through the seasons

    All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


    Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

    Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

Acupuncture, Menopause and Beyond, Prism Blog, Sex & Relationships, Transgender Wellness

Menopause and Beyond

Menopause, ‘manopause’, and mid-life transitions can be beautiful, world-opening times in our lives when we discover new pieces of ourselves and become more at peace in our bodies. They can also sometimes be uncomfortable, tumultuous, and stressful. Just like hormonal fluctuations during puberty, shifting hormones during menopause are a major cause of this stress and discomfort. The goal of using acupuncture and herbs during this time is to reduce the symptoms of menopause and hormonal changes, regulate and balance your hormones for a smoother transition, and soothe anxiety, depression, and other mental health issues that can flare up during this time of great change. Whether you’re taking HRT (hormone replacement therapy) or not, acupuncture and herbs may help make your transition smoother and more enjoyable, and continue providing support long after these mid-life changes too. We happily work with MDs and other healthcare providers to give you the most well-rounded care possible.
Acupuncture and herbs may help to:
  • Balance hormones to soothe ups and downs
  • Reduce hot flashes and night sweats
  • Reduce breakthrough bleeding and regulate the menstrual cycle
  • Improve vaginal dryness
  • Improve erectile dysfunction
  • Smooth transition onto or off of HRT and hormone blockers (like tamoxifen or arimidex)
  • Reduce post-surgical pain, speed healing, and reduce scarring
  • Beyond menopause:
    • Improve circulation to reduce blood clots and heal leg sores
    • Reduce leg and ankle edema
    • Regulate low and high blood pressure
    • Reduce or reverse hair loss
  • Reduce fatigue
  • Improve sleep
  • Benefit memory and concentration
  • Reduce stress and soothe anxiety
  • Lift depression
  • Boost your immune system to keep you healthy through the seasons

shutterstock_442274029.jpg


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

 

Acupuncture, For Providers, hair loss, Menopause and Beyond, PCOS, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Plum Blossom for Hair Loss

Plum blossom therapy is a great alternative to prescription finasteride (which can come with unwanted side effects) and toxic creams and over the counter medications.

I love plum blossom therapy, it’s gentle and effective for hair loss (more details). It involves using a tiny hammer with light pressure just until slight redness appears. This stimulates circulation to the scalp which helps to reawaken hair follicles and encourage hair growth. DHT, the compound responsible for hair loss, is only formed in low oxygen environments, so by increasing circulation with plum blossom therapy, the concentration of DHT is reduced. Studies have shown an 80% success rate for androgenic alopecia % and a 97% effectiveness rate for alopecia aureata in all genders.

Plum blossom therapy can be used both for scalp hair loss and also for encouraging facial hair growth. It can even be used for reducing scars, wrinkles, pores, visible blood vessels, and can increase collagen and skin softness (for facial feminization therapy).

In combination with herbal formulas, this technique can create significant hair restoration. Find out more about herbal formulas for hair loss here.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

For more herbal estrogens, ideas, and resources see my previous posts: Feminizing Herbs and “The Basics.”

Acupuncture, Endometriosis, Neuropathy, PCOS, Prism Blog, Surgical Recovery, Transgender Wellness

Opening The Four Gates

One of the most common balancing and stress-relieving treatments is called “The Four Gates” and it’s just four points: two by your thumbs and two by your big toes.  It seems so simple, but it feels powerful! The 4 gates circulate energy throughout your body, improving your circulation, and releasing pain and stress out of the body. It works beautifully alone, or in combination with other points.

Together, these points are a great treatment for pain and stress, especially pain caused or aggravated by stress (think tight shoulders). We use it a lot for preventing menstrual cramps, releasing stress and anxiety, and easing headaches, tight muscles, and stress.

hi-2292499_1920Individually, the points by your thumbs enhance your immune system, reduce inflammation, ease pain, and treat anything to do with the face (headaches, facial pain, TMJ, allergies, colds, toothaches, acne, etc.) They are found at the place where your thumb rests on the opposite hand when you shake hands.

 

leg-1505033_1920The points by your big toes ease pain, calm the nervous system (for anxiety, depression, and other emotional issues), treat menstrual disorders, and assist your liver in detoxification. They are found in the depression between your big toe and second toe.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

For more herbal estrogens, ideas, and resources see my previous posts: Feminizing Herbs and “The Basics.”

Acupuncture, Endometriosis, Fertility and Pregnancy, For Providers, Menopause and Beyond, Prism Blog, Surgical Recovery, Transgender Wellness

Treating Post-Surgical Constipation

photo credit: Practical Cures on flickr CC

Constipation is extremely common post-surgery, especially in combination with constipating pain killers, less physical activity, and irregular fluid and food intake. Often a bowel movement is required before a hospital will let a patient go home, so encouraging this process is especially beneficial to get you home sooner.

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is extremely useful for alleviating postoperative constipation. Studies have shown that patients receiving regular acupuncture post-surgery actually perform better (have more frequent, easier,  less painful, more complete bowel movements) than those taking laxatives or stool softeners.

Points on your arms, legs, and abdomen are most frequently chosen for this purpose, especially points on either side of your navel and points on the stomach and large intestine ‘meridians’ (lines along the body in Chinese Medicine, sort of like dermatomes).

Acupressure

Several of these points can also be used at home as acupressure points for constipation. Press each point lightly (no more than an inch deep for abdominal points, about the pressure of holding hands for arm and leg points) for about 30 seconds at a time:

Massage

Belly massage is also helpful. You can find a Chi-Nei-Tsang practitioner near you, or watch this video demo to perform a similar belly massage yourself. You can also refer to the illustrated steps available here. There are many methods of breathing exercises for constipation as well that massage your belly from the inside!

Herbs

Acupuncture can be complemented with some herbs that stimulate bowel motility like:

Nutrition

Hydration is key. Drink plenty of water and incorporate more warm foods and beverages to wake up your digestive system gently. Try ginger tea, hot water with lemon, and bone broth. If you urinate more frequently than every 2 hours you may be drinking too much or too fast. If you urinate less frequently than every 5 hours you are dehydrated!

Eat warm, easy-to-digest foods like rice porridge, oatmeal, and mashed sweet potato or yams. When you’re ready, try lamb or vegetable and mushroom soup. Give your family and friends recipes to make for you during your recovery, such as: Magical Mineral Broth, Congee, and Almond flour ginger cookies.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

For more herbal estrogens, ideas, and resources see my previous posts: Feminizing Herbs and “The Basics.”


Further study:

  Acupuncture at ST25 and BL25   Acupuncture at LI11 and ST37   Acupuncture at ST25, BL25, LI11 and ST37   Medicine:oral use of mosapride citrate: 4-week oral use, 5mg, three times daily 0.5 hour before meal   Total
SBMs [1]
[units: times per week]
Mean (Standard Deviation)
  2.7  (1.9)   2.5  (1.7)   2.9  (2.0)   2.9  (2.8)   2.8  (2.1)
Bristol scale [2]
[units: units on a scale]
Mean (Standard Deviation)
  2.8  (1.3)   2.9  (1.4)   3.0  (1.5)   2.7  (1.4)   2.9  (1.8)
Degree of straining during defecation [3]
[units: participants]
0   5   8   9   5   27
1   63   60   68   59   250
2   68   69   58   72   267
3   30   35   28   31   124
no defecation   2   0   2   3   7

 

Acupuncture, Endometriosis, Fertility and Pregnancy, For Providers, Menopause and Beyond, Neuropathy, Prism Blog, Scar Reduction, Surgical Recovery, Transgender Wellness

Acupuncture for Scar Treatment

Why Should We Treat Scars?
Scars may not only be cosmetically undesirable, but may also have an impact on the health of the individual. This is especially true for very large scars; scars with abnormal coloration, lumpiness, numbness, tingling, itchiness, heat or cold sensations, achiness or pain, tenderness to touch, and muscle restriction.
Such scars and associated adhesions can indicate or lead to nerve and blood vessel damage, decreased range of motion and muscle strength, increased likelihood of future injury, and chronic pain (especially pins and needles, tingling, and numbness). Scars are especially notable on the torso, where underlying adhesions can impair bowel function, chronic pelvic pain or infertility, depending on the site of the scar.
In Chinese medicine, significant scars are considered to block the flow of the meridians, (similar to the nerve and blood vessel damage pointed to by Western medicine) causing not only pain and decreased circulation, but also potentially impaired internal organ function depending on the meridian affected.

Scar Treatment with Acupuncture and Herbs
Scars that are at least two weeks old can be treated with acupuncture and herbal medicine.
A 2014 study used local acupuncture (“surrounding the dragon“: using needles directly around and through the scar) with distal points (4 gates and ST36). After eight treatments in 5 weeks the scar pain had reduced from a 7/10 to a 1-2/10. Such treatments can not only reduce scar pain, but also help to break up scar tissue and adhesions, increase local circulation, and aid healing. This leads to flatter, smaller, less noticeable scars and a reduction of keloiding.
Moxibustion (a gentle warming treatment achieved by burning dried mugwort), may also be used. Small amounts of moxa may be burned directly on the skin -with a sesame oil cream as a medium to prevent burns- around the scar, or a stick of rolled moxa may be burned above the site to warm the area. Both methods are pleasant and effective.
Topical herbs can also be very beneficial for scar healing. It is generally best to apply your liniment of choice over the affected area before bed and cover with a tshirt (or other clean soft article of clothing depending on the site of the scar), so that it has plenty of time to soak in without washing or sweating which would interfere with product absorption during the day.

Which Topical Should You Choose?
  • Prism’s Scar Oil has frankincense and other essential oils that break up scar tissue in a tamanu oil base, a great oil for reducing the appearance of scars, including keloids.
  • Zheng Gu Shui is beneficial for deep scars that may have adhesions to underlying tissues (for example surgical scars). They can improve local circulation, healing of the scar and the area that was injured, and reduce associated pain. It is better for healing and restoring health to the area than for cosmetic scar reduction.
  • Wan Hua Oil prevents scarring, increases blood circulation, reduces swelling, and helps regenerate damaged tissues. Once the wound closes, massage the oil directly over the scar daily to prevent scarring and promote healing. This option is best to prevent cosmetic scars from surgery. It is also effective for scars from burns.
  • Aloe aids scar healing and reduces infection and swelling. If used during the healing process it can reduce the formation of scars. Be sure to use 100% aloe (fresh is best), not aloe with alcohol or other additives that can dry and irritate the area.
  • Ching Wan Hung oil promotes healing and new tissue growth, reduces scarring, and prevents infection. It is especially effective for scars from burns.
  • You can also use castor oil compresses, to break up deeper scar tissue and adhesions, but I don’t recommend this for new scars that are still healing (or any open wounds).

Note: Many people recommend the usage of Vitamin E on scars, but newer research shows that Vitamin E does not help reduce the appearance of scars, and in the case of surgical scars can actually make scars more visible due to the development of irritation or contact dermatitis.


Providers: read more about acupuncture scar treatments from Skya Abbate, DOM.

Additionally, my colleague, Dena Gold LAc, suggests a Japanese style version of surrounding the dragon that involved needling slightly outside the scar, towards and under under the scar superficially enough that the needle falls rather than roots. Dena also suggests checking the fire points of the channel the scar intersects and if they are tender, needle the metal and water points of that channel before treating the scar directly.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

For more herbal estrogens, ideas, and resources see my previous posts: Feminizing Herbs and “The Basics.”

 

Acupuncture, For Providers, Press, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Article Published in CJOM: Making Clinics Trans-Inclusive

I’m so honored to have had my article (First Steps Towards Making Your Clinic Trans-Inclusive) recently published in the California Journal of Oriental Medicine (CJOM), a semiannual peer-reviewed publication of the California State Oriental Medical Association (CSOMA). My hope is that this article will help other practitioners to start making their clinics more trans, queer, and gender spectrum inclusive.

To read the full article, subscribe to CJOM, pick up a copy at your local Acupuncture College, or view in PDF: Page One and Page Two.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.