An image of someone giving a therapeutic massage for chest pain from binding.
Prism Blog, Surgical Recovery, Transgender Wellness

Six Steps to More Comfortable Binding: Part Six

Guest blog from Sandy Baird DC of Riverstone Chiropractic


According to a Health Impact Study published in the Culture, Health, and Sexuality Journal, 97% of people who wear a binder experience uncomfortable side effects such as neck pain, shoulder pain, back pain, and trouble breathing.

Other than limiting the time you spend in a binder, changing/washing your binder often, and avoiding unsafe compression methods such as duct tape and ACE bandages, there are several steps you an take to decrease the discomforts associated with binding.

This collection of tips comes both from my personal experience wearing binders as well as my clinical experience in treating the musculoskeletal complaints that my clients experience from binding.

6. Power up your core

  • I’m not talking about getting six-pack abs or doing endless crunches.
    • When your deep postural core muscles are activated, your neck, back, and shoulders have to work less hard to hold you up.
    • Two of the best and most accessible exercises are core bracing and the dead bug.
  • Core bracing:
    • Lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet on the ground.
    • Find a posterior pelvic tilt (tuck your tailbone under to flatten your low back, versus arching your low back and having a big space between the floor and your low back).
    • It should feel like your pubic bone and your ribs are reaching for each other, even though your head and torso are relaxed on the ground.
    • Pull your belly button in towards your spine as if it could root ten feet down into the earth underneath you.
    • Now exhale fully while emphasizing this bracing.
    • Inhale and relax everything, allowing your belly to expand fully.
    • Exhale as you find the bracing again.
    • Repeat several times until you are comfortable finding this bracing.
    • This is the foundational movement to the dead bug.
  • Dead bug:
  • Lie on your back and bring your knees up to tabletop position (knees bent to 90, and shins parallel to floor).
  • Find a posterior pelvic tilt (tuck your tailbone under to flatten your low back, versus arching your low back and having a big space between the floor and your low back).
  • Slowly extend your right arm and left leg, and then return to the starting point.
  • Repeat on the other side for a total of 2×20.
  • If this movement is painful or challenging for you and you feel your low back pop up off the mat:
    • Return to a strong posterior pelvic tilt
    • Then shorten the lever arm of this movement by tapping your heel down to the floor instead of extending your whole leg out.

Check out previous blog posts for tips #1-5!

The stretches, self-muscle work, and strengthening exercises are from my full core and glutes strengthening program available for purchase at www.engineeringyourbody.com. And if you are interested in exploring muscle-work or joint adjusting to alleviate your muscle and joint pain, you can find out more about my practice at www.riverstonechiropractic.com.

In happiness and health,

Dr. Sandy Baird, DC

Oakland Chiropractor Sandy Baird

 


Bio:
I’m Dr. Sandy Baird, DC. I’ve been providing bodywork in the Bay Area for over ten years now. First as a massage therapist, and now as a doctor who combines soft tissue work with joint adjusting. I feel that it’s important for queers to have a safe space to have their bodies worked on. Many of us already shoulder a lot of extra stress and tension from being constantly judged, worrying about what bathrooms we should use, and having to actively resist and fight back for our rights as our new state of “normal”.


References:
Health impact of chest binding among transgender adults: a community-engaged, cross-sectional study: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13691058.2016.1191675

 


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get our free hormone health mini e-course.

Prism Blog, Surgical Recovery, Transgender Wellness

Six Steps to More Comfortable Binding: Part Five

Guest blog from Sandy Baird DC of Riverstone Chiropractic


According to a Health Impact Study published in the Culture, Health, and Sexuality Journal, 97% of people who wear a binder experience uncomfortable side effects such as neck pain, shoulder pain, back pain, and trouble breathing.

Other than limiting the time you spend in a binder, changing/washing your binder often, and avoiding unsafe compression methods such as duct tape and ACE bandages, there are several steps you an take to decrease the discomforts associated with binding.

This collection of tips comes both from my personal experience wearing binders as well as my clinical experience in treating the musculoskeletal complaints that my clients experience from binding.

5. Get adjusted

  • Tight or compressed muscles over time can:
    • Pull on joints
    • Create “stuck” spots in the spine
  • Even after you release the muscular tension:
    • These sticky fixations of the joints can remain
    • They limit range of motion
    • They cause pain
    • They cause sensations of tightness
  • Chiropractic adjustments are the only way to correct these fixations.
    • They can go a long way in terms of:
      • Relieving pain
      • Restoring motion

Look out for next week’s post for tip #6!

The stretches, self-muscle work, and strengthening exercises are from my full core and glutes strengthening program available for purchase at www.engineeringyourbody.com. And if you are interested in exploring muscle-work or joint adjusting to alleviate your muscle and joint pain, you can find out more about my practice at www.riverstonechiropractic.com.

In happiness and health,

Dr. Sandy Baird, DC

Oakland Chiropractor Sandy Baird

 


Bio:
I’m Dr. Sandy Baird, DC. I’ve been providing bodywork in the Bay Area for over ten years now. First as a massage therapist, and now as a doctor who combines soft tissue work with joint adjusting. I feel that it’s important for queers to have a safe space to have their bodies worked on. Many of us already shoulder a lot of extra stress and tension from being constantly judged, worrying about what bathrooms we should use, and having to actively resist and fight back for our rights as our new state of “normal”.


References:
Health impact of chest binding among transgender adults: a community-engaged, cross-sectional study: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13691058.2016.1191675

 


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get our free hormone health mini e-course.

Prism Blog, Surgical Recovery, Transgender Wellness

Six Steps to More Comfortable Binding: Part Four

Guest blog from Sandy Baird DC of Riverstone Chiropractic


According to a Health Impact Study published in the Culture, Health, and Sexuality Journal, 97% of people who wear a binder experience uncomfortable side effects such as neck pain, shoulder pain, back pain, and trouble breathing.

Other than limiting the time you spend in a binder, changing/washing your binder often, and avoiding unsafe compression methods such as duct tape and ACE bandages, there are several steps you an take to decrease the discomforts associated with binding.

This collection of tips comes both from my personal experience wearing binders as well as my clinical experience in treating the musculoskeletal complaints that my clients experience from binding.

4. Self-muscle work

  • Stress, tension, and anxiety can all manifest in muscular tightness.
    • There isn’t anything you can do to un-compress tissues that have been compressed all day, but there are some home-care exercises you can do to boost your resilience so you will best be able to handle the compression from a binder.
  • Foam roll your back muscles.
    • Sit on the floor with your legs in front of you, bend your knees and place your feet on the floor.
    • Place a foam roller horizontally across your mid-back and lean back against it.
    • Either cross your arms like you are hugging yourself, or clasp your hands behind your neck, and then use your heels to push into the floor to raise your hips.
    • Your head and torso will naturally lower as the foam roller moves upwards along your spine.
    • Find a rocking motion where your hips go up as your head and torso lower.
    • You can shift your weight to the muscles on one side of your spine at a time, or just keep things centered and get pressure on both sides at once.
    • After you have rolled out some of the tension in your back muscles, return your hips to the ground.
    • Reset the roller approximately at the level of your shoulder blades, and then inhale as you slowly extend your upper back over it.
    • Your head can drop back and down.
    • Exhale as you come back to the starting position.
    • This will create more general mobility through your thoracic spine (upper and mid-back).
  • Find a softball or tennis-ball-sized massage ball and some wall space.
    • Facing the wall, place the ball into the outer corner of your pec muscles (near the outside of your collarbone but before you get to your arm.
    • Roll through these chronically tight tissues until you find the tightest spot.
    • Hold pressure on that spot for about thirty seconds, remembering to breathe.
    • If you need more space for your face or your chest, you can move this exercise near a doorway and poke your head through the doorway.
    • If there is no doorway available, just place a yoga block between the ball and the wall to allow you some more space.

Look out for next week’s post for tip #5!

The stretches, self-muscle work, and strengthening exercises are from my full core and glutes strengthening program available for purchase at www.engineeringyourbody.com. And if you are interested in exploring muscle-work or joint adjusting to alleviate your muscle and joint pain, you can find out more about my practice at www.riverstonechiropractic.com.

In happiness and health,

Dr. Sandy Baird, DC

Oakland Chiropractor Sandy Baird

 


Bio:
I’m Dr. Sandy Baird, DC. I’ve been providing bodywork in the Bay Area for over ten years now. First as a massage therapist, and now as a doctor who combines soft tissue work with joint adjusting. I feel that it’s important for queers to have a safe space to have their bodies worked on. Many of us already shoulder a lot of extra stress and tension from being constantly judged, worrying about what bathrooms we should use, and having to actively resist and fight back for our rights as our new state of “normal”.


References:
Health impact of chest binding among transgender adults: a community-engaged, cross-sectional study: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13691058.2016.1191675

 


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get our free hormone health mini e-course.

Prism Blog, Surgical Recovery, Transgender Wellness

Six Steps to More Comfortable Binding: Part Three

Guest blog from Sandy Baird DC of Riverstone Chiropractic


According to a Health Impact Study published in the Culture, Health, and Sexuality Journal, 97% of people who wear a binder experience uncomfortable side effects such as neck pain, shoulder pain, back pain, and trouble breathing.

Other than limiting the time you spend in a binder, changing/washing your binder often, and avoiding unsafe compression methods such as duct tape and ACE bandages, there are several steps you an take to decrease the discomforts associated with binding.

This collection of tips comes both from my personal experience wearing binders as well as my clinical experience in treating the musculoskeletal complaints that my clients experience from binding.

3. Deep breathing and coughing

  • Before pulling on your binder for the day, build resilience in your lungs and rib muscles by taking three deep breaths.
    • If your mobility allows it, sweep your arms up overhead on your inhale, and gently lower your arms on your exhale.
    • During binding it may feel challenging to take very full breaths.
  • A centering meditation focused on connecting with your normal breathing pattern can be helpful in alleviating some of the anxiety that can come from feeling like you can’t get a deep breath.
    • You can create your own or download one of the many free meditation apps that are available to you.
  • After binding, take three deep breaths, then do three big coughs to clear any fluid that may be building up in the lungs.
    • This fires up the intercostal muscles, those little in-between-the-ribs muscles that don’t see a lot of activation due to being squished down under a binder.
  • Follow with another round of three more deep breaths and then three more coughs.

Look out for next week’s post for tip #4!

The stretches, self-muscle work, and strengthening exercises are from my full core and glutes strengthening program available for purchase at www.engineeringyourbody.com. And if you are interested in exploring muscle-work or joint adjusting to alleviate your muscle and joint pain, you can find out more about my practice at www.riverstonechiropractic.com.

In happiness and health,

Dr. Sandy Baird, DC

Oakland Chiropractor Sandy Baird

 


Bio:
I’m Dr. Sandy Baird, DC. I’ve been providing bodywork in the Bay Area for over ten years now. First as a massage therapist, and now as a doctor who combines soft tissue work with joint adjusting. I feel that it’s important for queers to have a safe space to have their bodies worked on. Many of us already shoulder a lot of extra stress and tension from being constantly judged, worrying about what bathrooms we should use, and having to actively resist and fight back for our rights as our new state of “normal”.


References:
Health impact of chest binding among transgender adults: a community-engaged, cross-sectional study: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13691058.2016.1191675

 


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get our free hormone health mini e-course.

Prism Blog, Surgical Recovery, Transgender Wellness

Six Steps to More Comfortable Binding: Part Two

Guest blog from Sandy Baird DC of Riverstone Chiropractic


According to a Health Impact Study published in the Culture, Health, and Sexuality Journal, 97% of people who wear a binder experience uncomfortable side effects such as neck pain, shoulder pain, back pain, and trouble breathing.

Other than limiting the time you spend in a binder, changing/washing your binder often, and avoiding unsafe compression methods such as duct tape and ACE bandages, there are several steps you an take to decrease the discomforts associated with binding.

This collection of tips comes both from my personal experience wearing binders as well as my clinical experience in treating the musculoskeletal complaints that my clients experience from binding.

2. Balance push and pull movements

  • Many trans-masculine folks hit the weight room to build up their pectoral muscles (chest muscles) in order to sculpt a more masculine physique.
  • But often during this quest to build a more muscular chest with pushing-type movements like the bench press or pushups, we neglect to strength-train our upper and mid-back muscles with pulling-type movements like:
    • rows
    • pull-ups
    • lat-pulldowns
  • This can lead to postural imbalances between the front and back of the body, which can add layers of pain and tension to a torso already taxed from the compression of a binder.
  • Not only is it important to balance upper-body pushing and pulling in the weight room, but also adding specific strengthening exercises such as:
    • The I-Y-T exercise
    • Rotator cuff external rotations with a band or a cable machine
  • These can greatly improve shoulder and back health and decrease postural strain.

Look out for next week’s post for tip #3!

The stretches, self-muscle work, and strengthening exercises are from my full core and glutes strengthening program available for purchase at www.engineeringyourbody.com. And if you are interested in exploring muscle-work or joint adjusting to alleviate your muscle and joint pain, you can find out more about my practice at www.riverstonechiropractic.com.

In happiness and health,

Dr. Sandy Baird, DC

Oakland Chiropractor Sandy Baird

 


Bio:
I’m Dr. Sandy Baird, DC. I’ve been providing bodywork in the Bay Area for over ten years now. First as a massage therapist, and now as a doctor who combines soft tissue work with joint adjusting. I feel that it’s important for queers to have a safe space to have their bodies worked on. Many of us already shoulder a lot of extra stress and tension from being constantly judged, worrying about what bathrooms we should use, and having to actively resist and fight back for our rights as our new state of “normal”.


References:
Health impact of chest binding among transgender adults: a community-engaged, cross-sectional study: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13691058.2016.1191675

 


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get our free hormone health mini e-course.

Prism Blog, Surgical Recovery, Transgender Wellness

Six Steps to More Comfortable Binding: Part One of Six

Guest blog from Sandy Baird DC of Riverstone Chiropractic


According to a Health Impact Study published in the Culture, Health, and Sexuality Journal, 97% of people who wear a binder experience uncomfortable side effects such as neck pain, shoulder pain, back pain, and trouble breathing.

Other than limiting the time you spend in a binder, changing/washing your binder often, and avoiding unsafe compression methods such as duct tape and ACE bandages, there are several steps you an take to decrease the discomforts associated with binding.

This collection of tips comes both from my personal experience wearing binders as well as my clinical experience in treating the musculoskeletal complaints that my clients experience from binding.

  1. Practice daily movement and stretching

Increasing circulation and stretching key muscles in your body can help release some of the tightness that builds up from the daily postural stress associated with binding.

One possible routine would start with five minutes of movement of your choice (walking, dancing, jumping jacks, etc) to increase general blood flow to your muscles.

Then spend 30-60 seconds performing each of the following stretches:

  • Trapezius muscles:
    • From a seated or standing position, tilt your right ear towards your right shoulder, imagining your neck growing long towards the sky before settling into the tilt.
    • This should bring a stretching sensation into your left neck muscles and trap muscles (the chronically tight muscle between your head and your shoulder.
    • If you want more of a stretch, you can reach up with your right hand and gently apply a bit of overpressure, being careful not to crunch your head down, but instead allowing more length in your neck.
  • Pectoralis minor muscle:
    • Find a doorway you can walk through.
    • Bring your right arm up and out to your side like a goalpost
    • Then place your right elbow and right wrist against the doorframe.
    • Your elbow should be level with your shoulder.
    • Slowly lean your torso forward into the door opening while keeping your elbow and wrist in contact with the doorframe.
    • If this stretch creates any pinching sensation in your shoulder, you can alternatively lie atop a foam roller placed vertically along your spine (head and hips supported) and drop your arms out to the sides.
  • Side stretch:
    • Reach your arms overhead if that is available to you, or plant your hands on your hips.
    • On your inhale, reach and lean upwards and over to your left side.
    • If your arms are overhead you may want to grasp your right wrist with your left hand.
    • You should feel a stretch along the right side of your body through your ribcage.
  • Cobra stretch:
    • lying face-down, place your hands under your shoulders with your palms down and fingers pointing forwards.
    • Draw your elbows back and in towards your sides so your shoulders won’t hunch up by your ears.
    • Then press up gently until you feel a generalized stretch through the front of your chest and abdomen.

Look out for next week’s post for tip #2!

The stretches, self-muscle work, and strengthening exercises are from my full core and glutes strengthening program available for purchase at www.engineeringyourbody.com. And if you are interested in exploring muscle-work or joint adjusting to alleviate your muscle and joint pain, you can find out more about my practice at www.riverstonechiropractic.com.

In happiness and health,

Dr. Sandy Baird, DC

Oakland Chiropractor Sandy Baird

 


Bio:
I’m Dr. Sandy Baird, DC. I’ve been providing bodywork in the Bay Area for over ten years now. First as a massage therapist, and now as a doctor who combines soft tissue work with joint adjusting. I feel that it’s important for queers to have a safe space to have their bodies worked on. Many of us already shoulder a lot of extra stress and tension from being constantly judged, worrying about what bathrooms we should use, and having to actively resist and fight back for our rights as our new state of “normal”.


References:
Health impact of chest binding among transgender adults: a community-engaged, cross-sectional study: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13691058.2016.1191675

 


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get our free hormone health mini e-course.

Prism Blog

Guest Post: Techniques to Fall Asleep When Living With Chronic Pain

Guest Post by Sarah Cummings


Life is often cruelly ironic. Especially when it comes to sleep.

You see, sleep is generally seen as the single most effective thing we can do for the health of our body. Both mentally and physically. If you’re feeling in any way under the weather, be it the flu, an injury or even depression, sleep has been proven to provide relief. Yet when we suffer from something, say chronic pain, sleep is often the hardest thing to achieve.

That’s not to say we shouldn’t try, however, it may take a little effort but the benefits of regularly getting a good night’s rest are truly worth it. In fact it has been stated that there isn’t a single function or process within either the body or brain that isn’t enhanced by sleep, and impaired by the lack of it. Wow!

If you suffer from chronic pain, good quality sleep will certainly improve your ability to cope with the stresses and strains of the day. But how to get to sleep in the first place? Well, read on below and I’ll give you some tried and tested techniques.

Get outside early in the day

A healthy pre-bed routine doesn’t just start an hour before bed, it starts from the moment you wake up in the morning. Everything you do during the course of the day plays a role in how well you’ll sleep at night. One of the very best, and easiest ways to improve your odds of dropping off to sleep promptly at night is to get outside early in the morning.

You see, your body has an internal clock, a system that tells you when to wake and when to sleep. Daylight plays a very important role in regulating this clock. Getting outside early and bathing yourself in light helps to keep your clock well calibrated. Plus, getting outside and into nature is a proven mood enhancer and stress reliever. The happier and less stressed we are, the better we sleep.

Watch your caffeine intake

As we’ve already covered, everything you do during the day can help or hinder how well you sleep. For instance caffeine has a half life of six hours. Huh? What that means is it takes six hours for 50% of the caffeine to be flushed from your body. So, 25% of the caffeine in a cup of joe you drink at midday is still in your system come midnight. Shocking right? You wouldn’t drink a quarter of a cup of coffee just before bed would you. Well, you might want to start limiting your afternoon brews.

Have a good wind-down routine

If you’ve had a hard day, and let’s face it, any day with chronic pain is a hard day. It can be all to easy to simply flick on the box and veg out for a few hours in the evening. We are living in the golden years of television after all.

There’s nothing wrong with watching a bit of telly, the problems for your sleep come when you watch it right up until bedtime. Screens of all kinds, from TVs to smartphones, give off a form of bluelight that mimics daylight. This plays havoc with the body’s production of melatonin, the hormone that signals to the rest of our body that it’s time for bed.

The solution is simple, you can still watch your favourite shows but just make sure you give yourself a window of an hour between powering down all the screens in your house and laying ear on pillow. Yep, that includes your smartphone!

Make your bed a sleep sanctuary

Your bed should only ever be used for two things, sex and sleep. What it isn’t is a home cinema, an office, a dining room or somewhere to manage your social media empire.

The brain forms associations very quickly, ones that are often very hard to break. If you watch movies or reply to work emails in bed, the connection between your bed and sleep will be weakened.

Reclaim your bed for sleep (and sex) alone and you’ll soon find that not only do you find it easier to conk out but you’ll also sleep deeper, and for longer. Oh, and the better you sleep, the better your sex drive. Now that’s what I call a win-win.

So, there you have it sleep fans – the importance of sleep and a few techniques you can adopt to improve your odds of getting more of it – sleep that is. Like everything in life, improving your sleep will take time and effort, but believe it’s worth it. Everything truly is better in the morning. At least after a good night’s sleep it is. Experiment, make notes and experiment again, it’s worth getting it right.


Bio:

Hi there, I’m Sarah and I have to admit something a little embarrassing, I’m in love with sleep. I adore it. It’s my hobby, it’s my passion and it’s even my job. Every day when I’m not tucked up in bed you can find me at my desk researching and writing about all things slumber. My colleagues and I at the Sleep Advisor blog truly believe that better sleep has the power to transform us all in healthier and happier humans. It worked for me, it can work for you too!


Prism does not receive any compensation for this blog piece, clicks, or referrals.

All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get our free hormone health mini e-course.

Prism Blog

Featured on RiverstoneChiropractic.com: Acupuncture and Post-Surgical Care

Hi everyone! I’m so excited to share my newest article, which was featured on riverstonechiropractic.com (my favorite—and LGBTQ-focused!—chiropractor). Click to read more.

“In Chinese medicine, surgery is considered to block the flow of the meridians (similar to nerve and blood vessel damage in Western medicine). Improperly healed scars and old scar tissue can have the same effect, potentially causing pain, sensation loss, decreased circulation, and even impaired internal organ function depending on the depth of the scar tissue. Acupuncture as soon as possible after surgery helps to promote healing, reduce pain, swelling, and bruising, and prevent scar tissue from forming. Once the bandages are removed, scars can be worked on directly to prevent adhesions and reduce the appearance of scars. Cupping massage is also used to treat surgical scarring and adhesions to underlying tissues, and moxa can be used for post-surgical pain as well as reducing scars…

Surgical scars that are at least two weeks old can be worked on with acupuncture. Such treatments not only reduce scar pain, but also help to break up scar tissue and adhesions, increase local circulation, and aid healing. This leads to less noticeable scars and a reduction in keloiding. Scars may not only be cosmetically undesirable, but may also have an impact on health…”

Click to read more.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

 

Acupuncture, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Chinese Medicine, Natural Transition, and the Gender Binary

Chinese Medicine, Natural Transition, and the Gender Binary. A guest post on Tynan Rhea’s website (founder of postpartumsex.com).

A few excerpts:

Yin and yang are often associated with female and male energy respectively, which leads to the misconception that Chinese Medicine is inherently binary and therefore inappropriate for trans medicine. It is true that most diagnoses in Chinese medicine refer to the interaction between opposites: hot and cold, internal and external, excess and deficient, yin and yang, among others. However, yin and yang, though often associated with male and female energy, are more accurately represented by masculine and feminine.

The great thing about Chinese Medicine is that we always work from a constitutional root. We look at the person’s tongue and feel their pulse to identify the root of a person’s pattern and work on that as well as the symptoms. The goal is always to bring the patient into alignment with their constitution, not to change them based on societal expectations of their sex and what their hormone profile will look like.

I see many trans men pre-testosterone present as yang (testosterone) deficient and many trans women pre-estrogen present as yin (estrogen/progesterone) deficient. Treatment in this case affirms their identity and assists their transition. Once folks have been on hormones for a while, sometimes testosterone depletes yin and spironolactone (a testosterone-blocker) depletes yang. In this case, it is appropriate to tonify the depleted energy to bring the person back into balance. This does not in any way counteract their transition, it gently balances and keeps them healthy and aligned with their constitutions. Similarly, an intersex person with yin deficiency would be treated differently than an intersex person with yang deficiency, regardless of their chromosomes or type of intersex diagnosis.

Read more


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

 

 

Endometriosis, For Providers, Prism Blog, Surgical Recovery, Transgender Wellness

Supplements for Surgery

Supplements and Surgery:

You most likely know already that there are certain supplements and medications that you should avoid before surgery. Mostly these are supplements and medications that can cause excess bleeding, as well as those that can interfere with the anesthesia.

Surgeons’ opinions vary on which medications and supplements are okay and when to stop taking them. You should follow your surgeon’s recommendations to the letter. These suggestions will likely be more conservative than the ones you receive from your surgeon, because in holistic healthcare, we are interested in helping you achieve optimal health, not just the absence of disease. You can choose to follow these recommendations only if they fit with your surgeon’s recommendations as well. Do not take any supplements or herbs which you know you are allergic or sensitive to or which your doctor or surgeon has told you to avoid.

What to Avoid Before Surgery:

It is most important to avoid potential blood thinners for at least 7 days before and 3 days after surgery. Your surgeon may tell you to avoid them for even longer, depending on the type of surgery you are having. This includes any prescription blood thinners as well as garlic, ginkgo, vitamin E, fish oil/omega 3, and aspirin, ibuprofen, aleve, and other NSAIDs.

Some surgeons may also recommend that you avoid St. John’s Wort, dong quai/dang gui/angelica, feverfew, goldenseal, ginseng, ginger supplements, saw palmetto, reishi, echinacea, ephedra/ma huang, kava, licorice, and valerian for 7 days before and 3 days after surgery, as these can cause excess bleeding.

I tend to err on the side of caution, stopping all herbs and supplements (and any medications your surgeon tells you to avoid) 7 days before surgery.

Most surgeons say that tylenol is okay to take before surgery as needed, but don’t take it if you can avoid it since tylenol can be hard on the liver and your liver is already going to be stressed by the anesthesia. Check with your surgeon when deciding what to take.

Ideally, avoid alcohol, tylenol, and anything else that is hard on your liver 1 month before and after surgery to allow your body to safely process the anesthesia. This obviously does not apply if your surgeon prescribes or recommends tylenol before or after surgery.

Get plenty of sleep, exercise, stay hydrated, and avoid sugar (to keep your immune system healthy) in the month before surgery, and always!

Before Surgery Supplements:

There are certain supplements that can help you recover faster from surgery and risk less side effects. It is helpful to start taking these at least one month before surgery. Do not take any supplements that your surgeon does not approve and remember to stop your supplements one week before surgery.

Starting one month before surgery:
A multivitamin with 25-50mg of B vitamin complex
50 mg CoQ10/day: reduces stress of surgery on heart, improves recovery
500-1000mg/day vitamin C: necessary for wound healing, helps your body produce collagen
Milk thistle: detoxes the liver to prepare for successful anesthesia
2000-5000 IU vitamin D/day with food if not already included in your multivitamin

Starting 2 weeks before surgery, add:
30-50mg zinc picolinate/day with food: necessary for wound healing
Probiotic blend with acidophilis and bifida: reduces risk of post-surgical infection

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After Surgery

After surgery, start off with broths, including bone broth, fresh juices, soups, and other easy to digest foods like oatmeal. Green drinks and whole food based protein shakes are also great when you’re not up for eating real foods yet. Stay away from sugary drinks like gatorade and pedialyte, starches, breads, and crackers, as they can deplete your immune system and cause constipation.

After Surgery Supplements

As long as your surgeon says it’s okay, take 1000mg vitamin C as soon as you get home from the hospital and continue daily. Vitamin C is necessary for wound healing, helps your body produce collagen, and helps your liver break down the anesthetic.

Some surgeons will recommend waiting a few days before restarting supplements and herbs. As long as your surgeon says it’s okay, the day after surgery, start taking Resinall E from Health Concerns (three tablets three times per day, available by prescription from Prism) or 1000-1500 mg standardized bromelain 3x/day on an empty stomach. This helps speed recovery and reduce swelling and bruising. It is mandatory to take it on an empty stomach, otherwise it will just help digest your food but not have any effect on swelling and bruising.

Starting 3 days after surgery, add:
250mg B6 2x/day (or substitute your multivitamin if it contains B6): reduces swelling
100-200mg CoQ10/day: reduces stress of surgery on heart, improves recovery
Milk thistle: detoxes anesthesia from the liver
30-50mg zinc picolinate/day with food: necessary for wound healing
Probiotic blend with acidophilis and bifida: reduces risk of post-surgical infection
2000-3000mg omega 3 per day: reduces inflammation and improves circulation
Arnica 30C 4-5x/day: reduces pain, bruising, and swelling
2000-5000 IU vitamin D/day with food

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After one week post-surgery:
You can stop the B6/multivitamin, unless this is part of your regular supplement regimen

After two weeks post-surgery, you can stop taking:
Vitamin C or return to your usual dose
Zinc
Arnica
Bromelain
Lower your fish oil/omega 3 dose to 500-1000mg/day

One month post-surgery:
You are done with this supplement plan! Return to you regular supplements and herbs as recommended by your acupuncturist and doctors.

Happy healing :)


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


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Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

 

Acupuncture, Press, Prism Blog

Spotlight with BCA Clinic

July Practitioner Spotlight with Katrina Hanson

My favorite part of my job is watching people regain ownership of their healing process, reconnect with their bodies, and make positive changes in their lives.

I came to acupuncture through a love of herbal medicine, sparked by my botanist father who taught me a deep appreciation for plants. On road trips growing up, he’d suddenly pull over to the side of the road, jump out of the car, and sprint up a hill to a tiny rare flower that he somehow spotted while driving… Click to keep reading!


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

Fertility and Pregnancy, Prism Blog, Sex & Relationships, Transgender Wellness

Does Sex Cause Miscarriages? Guest Post by Tynan Rhea of postpartumsex.com

This article should not be used to replace medical advice. If your doctor has advised you to abstain from sex for fear of miscarriage and you do not have any of the conditions listed below, you may benefit from a second opinion, further research, or asking your doctor to explain why it’s important for your particular body and pregnancy to abstain from sex as your situation may have unique variables that require important consideration.


Will sex cause a miscarriage? Short answer: NO! If you have a healthy pregnancy, sex will not cause a miscarriage. So why do so many people (including doctors) sometimes tell people to stop having sex in pregnancy if there is talk about a miscarriage?

It’s easy to come across resources that state if someone has a history of miscarriage their doctor may ask them to refrain from sex for the first trimester unless otherwise noted. There are a few problems with this suggestion.

  1. “Experts” often do not specify if the problem is with penetration or orgasms or both.
  2. A review of the literature on this topic concluded there is no scientific research that has been conducted to validate this concern in a healthy pregnancy.
  3. First trimester miscarriages are generally thought to be due to “a major genetic problem or the body’s ways of stopping a pregnancy that is not going to develop healthily… it can be the uterine environment itself somehow, but that has certainly nothing to do with sex itself. In all my medical training I can’t think of any reason why a [person] would need pelvic rest in the first trimester” (Dr. E. Queenan, personal communication, April 24, 2017).
Later in pregnancy there are some instances where pelvic rest (remember this means no penetration only, not necessarily orgasms or oral sex) may be recommended:
  • risk of preterm labour
  • placenta previa
  • placental abruption
  • cervical insufficiency
  • ruptured membranes
  • presence of sexually transmitted infections or viruses (and depending on the infection, condoms or barriers may be sufficient for protection. Consult with your doctor or a sexual health clinic if you’re uncertain).

The problem with the advice to abstain from having sex is that this often causes a lot of distress for people or negatively impacts intimacy in relationships. Connecting with our bodies or partners is vital before the tumultuous postpartum period! Sex isn’t the only way to do this, of course, and if you’re already not that interested in sex than that’s absolutely okay and normal. But for individuals and relationships where sex is an integral part of life, telling people to abstain from sex can be really harmful.

If your pregnancy is healthy and you want to have sex, enjoy yourself! And know that the loving relationships you cultivate with your body and your partners during pregnancy will only serve to benefit you and your family.


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P R O F E S S I O N A L   B I O: Tynan Rhea is a settler with German and Czechoslovakian ancestry. Tynan has a private practice online and in Toronto as a counselor, aromatherapist, and doula specializing in sex, intimacy, and relationships throughout the reproductive years. Tynan is also the founder of PostpartumSex.com. Tynan graduated from the University of Waterloo with a Joint Honours Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Sexuality, Marriage, & Family. They received their doula training from the Revolutionary Doula Training program and their aromatherapy training with Anarres Apothecary Apprenticeship program. Tynan approaches their practice from sex-positive, trauma-informed, anti-oppressive, and feminist frameworks. You can find Tynan on Facebook, Instagram @TynanRhea or TynanRhea.com


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

 

Acupuncture, For Providers, Press, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Acupuncture and Trans Medicine

Just a little throwback to this video about my gender-inclusivity activism at my alma mater, the Acupuncture and Integrative Medicine College (AIMC) Berkeley. It’s so wonderful to reflect on how much my practice and my knowledge has evolved; all with the support of my wonderful patients. This has been a long process and I’m looking forward to continuing the journey with all of you!


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.