Endometriosis, Fertility and Pregnancy, Menopause and Beyond, PCOS, Prism Blog, Take Charge of Your Hormones E-Course, Transgender Wellness

Balance Your Hormones While You Sleep

 

How to Balance Hormones with Sleep.

Enough quality sleep builds our immune systems, repairs cellular damage, reduces inflammation in the body, and resets hormones (including regulating our blood sugar levels and stress hormones).  With chronic sleep deprivation (6 hours or less per night), our cortisol (stress hormone) levels begin to rise, negatively affecting not only our reproductive hormones, but also our thyroid hormones and our risk for a number of diseases, like heart disease, type two diabetes, cancer, and more. You may not think you need more than 6 hours of sleep, but your body does. Lack of sleep is responsible for 100,000 car crashes, 40,000 injuries, and 1550 deaths per year, as well as the Exxon Valdez disaster and Chernobyl nuclear accident!

Our bodies actually react to limited sleep in a similar way that they would react to starvation. Lack of sleep similarly stresses our systems, and actually increases our food intake. We feel hungrier when we’re not sleeping enough. Not only that, but our appetite for carbohydrates, especially sugar and junk foods, significantly increase. One imbalance in the system -lack of sleep- can therefore lead to a chain of negative effects in our bodies and in our lifestyles that can culminate in serious hormone dysregulation.

Insomnia has actually been shown to increase symptoms of menopause, PCOS, infertility (lack of sle, and other reproductive hormone issues.

The Rules of Restorative Sleep

  • Get to bed by 11pm. 10pm is ideal. When we stay up later than that, we get that ‘second wind’ effect, which is actually a boost of cortisol from our adrenals, preventing us from sleeping and -in the long term- causing adrenal fatigue. Setting a regular bedtime and wake-time can help us get to sleep and sleep more deeply.
  • Keep electronics out of the bedroom and don’t look at screens for 1-2 hours before bed, including your phone! If you use your phone for an alarm, turn it to airplane mode. Remember the saying: use the bedroom for only two activities, sleep and sex!
  • Sleep 8-9 hours in the darker fall/winter months and 7-8 hours in spring/summer. This is a natural seasonal rhythm for our bodies.
  • Keep your bedroom as dark as possible. No night lights or bright alarm clocks. Use thick curtains to block outside lights. Use a face mask if necessary.
  • Use ear plugs if you are bothered by sounds.
  • Eat a high protein breakfast within one hour of waking up to set a healthy melatonin-cortisol cycle for the day, ensuring you’ll be sleepy at bedtime.
  • Don’t use sleep medications, including Benadryl for sleep. They make you artificially sleepy, but prevent you from deeper more restorative rest. Alcohol can do the same thing so if you’re having trouble sleeping, avoid alcohol as well.
  • Make your bedroom cozy. You want to feel comfortable there, like you can’t wait to get to bed.
  • Manage stress levels during the day as much as possible. We all know what it feels like to be up at night ruminating over that exam or the work meeting or talk with our spouses that didn’t go well. Journaling, meditation, exercise, and other stress relief activities can help prevent this. Equally important is acknowledging our feelings, setting healthy boundaries, and asking for help when we need something. Vitamin B, D, and EPA, along with many herbs, can also be helpful for regulating stress levels.
  • Avoid caffeine, nicotine, and other stimulants after 1pm. Better yet, avoid them altogether! It gives us false energy that prevents us from rest and can lead to adrenal fatigue if overused.
  • If you’re having trouble resetting your sleep cycle, ask your healthcare provider if you should try a melatonin or magnesium supplement before bed.

Resources:

https://www.healthstatus.com/health_blog/pcos/sleep-is-critical-for-hormone-balance-and-pcos/

https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/502825

http://natural-fertility-info.com/problems-sleeping-hormonal-balance.html


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

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Endometriosis, Fertility and Pregnancy, Menopause and Beyond, PCOS, Prism Blog, Take Charge of Your Hormones E-Course, Transgender Wellness

10 Ways to Eliminate Cancer-Causing Estrogens

 

What are Xenoestrogens?

Xenoestrogens are hormones in the environment that mimic estrogen. Unlike naturally produced estrogens, when xenoestrogens enter our bodies they disrupt our endocrine systems, throwing our hormones out of whack and potentially causing cancer, especially breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, and prostate cancer.

Xenoestrogens are most commonly found in plastics, pesticides, beauty products, receipts, and many more household items. Some of them show up on ingredient lists or labels, like parabens, BPA, phlalates, BHA, red dye no.3, and PCBs.

10 Ways to Eliminate Xenoestrogens

  1. Don’t take receipts. Snap a photo with your phone or get an e-receipt instead.
  2. Use organic beauty products that are free of parabens. Use only nail polish that’s “5-free”.
  3. Skip the plastic bags. Use paper or reusable bags instead.
  4. Stay away from canned foods and drinks. Carbonated and acidic products like soda and tomato sauce are especially known for leaching BPA from cans.
  5. Don’t store food in plastic. Especially do not microwave food in plastic containers or styrofoam. Throw out plastic water bottles that have sat in a hot car. Switch to glass and stainless steel water bottles and food containers whenever possible.
  6. Switch to organic produce to avoid endocrine-disrupting pesticides. This is especially important for produce you can’t peel, like berries, spinach, celery, and greens. Always wash and peel non-organic produce if possible.
  7. Avoid processed foods, food dye, and food with preservatives, especially for kids.
  8. Don’t buy plastic baby toys, especially for toys that will end up being chewed on.
  9. Use chlorine-free and unbleached paper products, like tampons, pads, toilet paper, and tissues.
  10. Switch to biodegradable cleaning products like laundry detergents and dish soap. Skip the dryer sheets altogether.

All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


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Endometriosis, Fertility and Pregnancy, Menopause and Beyond, PCOS, Prism Blog, Take Charge of Your Hormones E-Course, Transgender Wellness

How to Balance Your Hormones with Exercise

 

How to Balance Hormones with Exercise.

We all know exercise is good for us. We also know that too much of a good thing isn’t good after all. This applies to exercise too!

When we exercise, we put our bodies in a state of stress. Cortisol, the ‘stress hormone’, increases when we exercise just like it does when we experiences other forms of stress. This can be good, because cortisol helps to repair tissue damage caused by exercise. However, cortisol also breaks down muscle proteins, encourages fat storage, especially around the midline, and causes undue stress to our body systems, including our hormones. Stress from exercise suppresses the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicular stimulating hormone (FSH), the hormones that stimulate ovulation and sperm production.

This means that too much exercise can cause infertility, amenorrhea (no periods), irregular cycles, and other hormonal issues. Additionally, research has shown that too much exercise can decrease testosterone in all sexes, and can decrease estrogen and progesterone in women.

Wait, I thought this was about exercise being good for hormones?

It is! In moderation. Light to moderate exercise actually reduces stress, the opposite of intense training sessions. Gentle yoga and walking are probably best known for this. Brief sessions or cardio or high intensity interval training are enough to get your heart rate up and get the health benefits of exercise without causing unecessary stress to your mind, body, or hormones. High intensity interval training (HIIT) actually increases testosterone and balances estrogen and progesterone, the opposite of excessive training sesssions.

When and how to Exercise for Hormone Regulation:

  1. Sit less: Sitting too much has many negative health effects, from cardiovascular health to muscle tension to mental health. It also messes with your hormones, especially insulin, which controls our blood sugar balance and can throw estrogen and progesterone out of whack too. Fidget, stand at your desk, walk and talk, set your phone or computer to ping at you every hour to remind you to get up and stretch, do some squats while you are watching TV.
  2. Walk more: Walking is a wonderful gentle exercise that improves hormone balance without causing extra stress. It’s also beneficial for our mental health, which in turn affects our hormones.
  3. Hight Intensity Interval Training: As well as strengthening your lungs and heart, it boosts testosterone and growth hormone, and improves insulin sensitivity. All you need is 12 to 20 minutes, three times a week. That’s it!
  4. Yoga: Not only does it improve flexibility, it also lowers your level of stress hormones and helps improve your mood. Check out yoga poses for hormone balance here.

Once you start thinking about exercise as part of your lifestyle, rather than another item on your to do list, it will start to feel fun and even like self-care. You don’t have to add any extra time to your day to stand instead of sitting, you don’t have to give up your favorite tv show, watch it during your 20 minute HIIT session! You can take a walk instead of drinking that second cup of coffee in the afternoon. When you piece all of this together, you can make major changes not only to your hormone balance, but to your overall health and mental health.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


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Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

 

Endometriosis, Fertility and Pregnancy, Menopause and Beyond, PCOS, Prism Blog, Take Charge of Your Hormones E-Course, Transgender Wellness

6 Ways Water Helps You Balance Your Hormones

 

We Are Water.

Water makes up 1/2 to 1/3 of our body weight. Our bodies depend on water for nearly all processes. When we’re not well hydrated, our tissues aren’t well hydrated, and this can disrupt our body systems, including hormone regulation.

  1. Water is necessary to flush out excess toxins and hormones. You know this if you’ve noticed that your urine changes color and smell depending on how much water you drink and whether you take medications or vitamins.
  2. Water is part of our blood, which transports hormones around the body and carries out the excess. Water flows through our kidneys and liver to process and excrete hormones and toxins.
  3. When we are dehydrated, our bodies automatically start a stress response because our bodies know that dehydration can be a life threatening situation. A stress response elevates cortisol hormone levels, sending all of our other hormones out of whack.
  4. Water is necessary in our bowels to keep our stools soft so that they can be excreted easily, rather than causing constipation. Remember that first lesson on fiber? Fiber can’t exit our bodies (taking all of our excess hormones and toxins with it) if we don’t have water to flush it out.
  5. Our brain needs water to properly control the release and balance of the hormones throughout our systems. If our brain cells are dehydrated, they don’t function properly.
  6. Water helps us maintain our temperature and hydrate and nourish our skin and other tissues. As such, it can help combat symptoms of hormone imbalance like night sweats, hot flashes, vaginal dryness, and acne.

 

When and how to drink water:

We need to consume enough water to make up for water loss, through urine, bowel movements, vomiting, sweating, breathing, and skin evaporation. If you’re sick and have diarrhea or vomiting, or nasal discharge, you’re losing extra fluids. If you sweat a lot, exercise, or are in a very hot climate, you’re losing extra fluids.

To stay sufficiently hydrated, you should be drinking at least .5 oz of water for every pound you weigh. For example, if you weigh 140lbs, you should drink 70oz a day. Just divide your weight by two to find the ounces of water you should drink per day. This amount will be more if you are losing extra fluids. Caffeine and alcohol are dehydrating too, so if you consume these things you need extra water as well. This amount includes:

  • Water
    • 2 cups before breakfast, 1 during breakfast, 1 between breakfast and lunch, 1 during lunch, 1 between lunch and dinner, 1 during dinner, 1 after dinner.
    • 2 cups 2 hours before exercise, and 1 cup every 20 minutes while exercising
  • Lemon water
  • Sparkling water
  • Herbal tea
  • Soup
  • High water content fruits and vegetables, especially raw fruits and vegetables
  • Water ‘sole’
  • NOT juice, caffeinated beverages, soda or beverages with sugar added! These are not hydrating and not beneficial for hormone balance.

All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


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Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

Endometriosis, Fertility and Pregnancy, Menopause and Beyond, PCOS, Prism Blog, Take Charge of Your Hormones E-Course, Transgender Wellness

Healthy Fats

 

Fat is good for you.

Coconut oil has been getting a lot of attention lately, but after 30 years of being told otherwise, you still might have a hard time wrapping your head around the fact that fat can be good for you.

We are made of fats! Fat cells make up our bone marrow and are stored in our lungs, heart, liver, spleen, kidneys, and intestines. Our brain cells are made of fats called lipids and our hormones are made of lipids too. Lipids are an essential part of our immune systems and they reduce inflammation. They form the boundaries of each of our cells and, in fact, our cells can’t communicate with each other without lipids. Our bile (remember that from the last lesson?), which helps us break down the food we eat and absorb nutrients, is derived from lipids. Lipids are necessary for us to absorb and transport fat-soluble vitamins like A, D, E, and K. Plus, our ‘body fat‘ -which, by the way, is actually necessary for storing energy, maintaining blood sugar levels, cushioning our skeleton, and keeping us warm- is of course made of fat.

Every year, ten percent of our fat cells die and are replaced. In other words, we need to make a lot of new fat cells every year. Some of this fat we can make ourselves, but certain essential lipids can only be obtained through diet. We need fats in our diets to survive!

What does this have to do with hormones?

Our hormones are made of fats called lipids. Lipids are necessary for hormone production (we can’t make our hormones without fats). A moderate amount of healthy fats daily helps us regulate hormone production.

Studies in cisgender males have shown that consumption of saturated fats (like meat and dairy) and monounsaturated fats (like olive oil) may increase testosterone production.

Studies in cisgender women have shown that saturated fats (especially from meat and dairy raised with hormones) can increase estrogen levels. However, coconut oil and avocadoes, which contain a mix of saturated and unsaturated fats, can decrease estrogen levels.

Overall, focusing on monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats -especially omegas- and avoiding hydrogenated and trans fats is the best option.

Remember the last lesson, on fiber?

Bile is produced by the liver to help us digest fats. After it has done its job, bile binds to fiber in our digestive system which allows them to be secreted together, taking toxins and excess hormones with them. Eating a fatty low-fiber meal prevents this process from happening properly. For proper hormone regulation you must include BOTH healthy fats and fiber in each meal.

Which fats to eat:

YES! Non-hydrogenated monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats:

  • Sunflower, hazelnut, olive, safflower, avocado, cottonseed, peanut, sesame, and canola oils
  • Macadamias, almonds, hazelnuts, pecans, peanuts, sunflower seeds, flax seeds, and other nuts and seeds
  • Olives, avocadoes
  • Herring, salmon, mackerel, albacore, tuna, trout, goose, duck
  • Fish oil and cod liver oil supplements

YES! to certain saturated fats:

  • Coconut oil, coconut, and coconut milk, palm oil, avocado oil and avocadoes
  • Organic grass-fed dairy and meat products

NO to other saturated fats:

  • Dairy and meat raised with hormones
  • Processed meats like hot dogs, spam, processed jerky, deli meat, and salami

NO Trans fats and NO hydrogenated fats (trans fats are illegal now, but the FDA has given companies a few years to comply with the law):

  • Margarine, shortening, fast food, tv dinners, store-bought pastries and cookies, deep fried foods, many pre-packaged and freezer foods
  • Check the ingredients! Labels list hydrogenated fats under the ingredients and trans fats under the nutrition facts.

All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

Endometriosis, Fertility and Pregnancy, Menopause and Beyond, PCOS, Prism Blog, Surgical Recovery, Take Charge of Your Hormones E-Course, Transgender Wellness

Fiber Fiber Fiber!

 

Everyone knows fiber is important, but do you know why?

You’ve probably heard that fiber is a good way to maintain regular bowel movements. Maybe you’ve even heard about its possible role in preventing colon cancer or that fiber is beneficial for immunity. You may not know that fiber can balance your hormones too!

Fiber moves our digestion along at a healthy pace, allowing us to properly eliminate waste products -including excess hormones- rather than reabsorbing them. It is beneficial to properly eliminate both naturally produced hormones and prescription hormones, such as those used for menopause or medical transition.

PMS, mood swings, headaches, acne, heavy menstrual bleeding, spotting between periods, fibroids, endometriosis, hot flashes, breast, thyroid, and prostate cancers can all be caused by an imbalance in hormones.

If you’re not having (at least) daily bowel movements, you’re not eliminating excess hormones as often as you should be and are more likely to suffer from these conditions.

Cisgender “women are more likely affected by constipation by threefold compared with men. The female colon is longer and has more twists and turns, like a rollercoaster… We’re more likely to overuse laxatives, leading to weaker bowel muscles. We’re more likely to have painful hemorrhoids, which occur in 40 percent of pregnancies, and to restrain from pooping in public places.” Sara Gottfried MD.

How does it work?

Every time we eat, our liver produces bile, a substance full of digestive enzymes and other ingredients that help us break down fats and other nutrients into smaller particles. Some of these smaller particles are toxins (from medications, preservatives, etc) and metabolic waste products (including excess hormones like estrogen) which are then soaked up into the bile. When you have adequate fiber in your diet, this toxin-filled bile binds to fiber and together they are excreted from the body through a bowel movement, taking those toxins and waste products with it.

If you don’t have adequate fiber, bile and the associated waste products have nothing to bind to, and they don’t move through your intestines as quickly. This allows those toxins and excess hormones to be reabsorbed into the blood stream and repeatedly recirculated through your system.

That’s not all! Fiber also:

What does this mean for our hormones?

If you don’t eliminate bile fast enough, the estrogen it holds is reabsorbed and your blood estrogen levels rise. “Those estrogens can stimulate the growth of abnormal cells” including cancer cells (Wisconsin-based nutritionist Karen Hurd), as well as increase the liklihood of endometriosis, PMS, and many other issues. The same holds true for other hormones in our bloodstream and the accumulation of these hormones can cause many different hormone imbalances.

How can I prevent this cycle and balance my hormones?

“A special kind of dietary fiber called lignin, present in flax seeds, beans and lentils, binds to estrogen in the digestive tract to ensure it is eliminated and not reabsorbed into our system. Dietary fiber also feeds the beneficial probiotic bacteria living in our gut and keeps them healthy. These probiotic bacteria are important because they can also prevent estrogen being reabsorbed from our colon back into circulation” (Dr. Amanda Tracy, ND).

Are you on board yet? Great! Let’s get started.

Tips for taking fiber:

Nerd out about fiber:

“There are two types of fiber, insoluble and soluble fiber. Insoluble fiber is found in the cell walls of plants and cannot be dissolved in water. This is beneficial as it adds bulk to stools by binding with water and acting as a stool softener to assist in moving it out of the digestive tract. Soluble fiber on the other hand dissolves in water and helps to slow the passage of food through the digestive tract, lower blood sugar levels, and reduce cholesterol. Both soluble and insoluble fiber are essential to a good diet” Brandy Augustine PhD. Soluble fiber also protects the intestinal barrier and contributes to a healthy microbiome.

The following foods contain soluble fiber (to support a healthy microbiome and steady blood sugar levels):

  • Oatmeal and oat bran
  • Rice bran
  • Barley
  • Apples
  • Oranges and other citrus
  • Strawberries
  • Pears
  • Beans
  • Lentils
  • Flax seeds
  • Berries
  • Chia seeds

The following foods contain insoluble fiber (to promote regular bowel movements and secretion of hormones and toxins):

  • Dark leafy greens
  • Whole grains
  • Nuts
  • Seeds
  • Dried fruit
  • Broccoli, cabbage, asparagus, cabbage, brussel sprouts, cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Onions
  • Turnips, beets, carrots
  • Apple skin

BONUS: The following contain prebiotic fiber (to support a healthy gut microbiome):

  • Legumes
  • Wheat, barley,
  • Potatoes
  • Rice
  • Bananas
  • Artichokes
  • Onions, garlic

Resources:

More tips for avoiding constipation and maintaining a healthy gut

http://dramandatracynd.blogspot.com/2013/02/fixing-your-hormone-problems-with-fiber.html

https://bodyunburdened.com/health-benefits-of-fiber/

https://experiencelife.com/article/fiber-why-it-matters-more-than-you-think/

http://www.brandyaugustine.com/journal/2014/7/7/3-ways-dietary-fiber-helps-maintain-hormone-balance


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

hair loss, Menopause and Beyond, PCOS, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Stop Hair Loss in Its Tracks

I recently taught a workshop on healthy hair care and preventing hair loss and I just want to share a few tips from the class with you!

Hair loss can have several causes, from stress to genetics to autoimmune disorders. Some of these are easier to solve than others, but treating our hair (and bodies) well can help slow -and in some cases reverse- hair loss no matter what the cause.

Some amount of hair loss is a natural part of the hair cycle. It’s normal to lose between 50-100 hairs on days you don’t shower, and up to 200 hairs on days you do. Which should tell you right away that if you’re concerned about hair loss you should be showering less often!

At any given point, about 90% of your hair follicles should be in the active growing phase and 10% should be in the dormant or falling out stage. Hair loss can involve either an imbalance in the number of active vs inactive follicles, or a change in the growth of active follicles so that they no longer produce hair of the original color, length, or texture. If you’re concerned that you’re losing too much hair, take about 60 hairs between two fingers and gently pull. If you get more than 5-8 hairs you likely have an imbalance in the number of active vs inactive follicles.

The most common form of hair loss is also the most well-known. Commonly called ‘male-pattern baldness’ or androgenic alopecia, it actually occurs in all genders. While there is certainly a genetic component to this type of hair loss, it can also be mediated with herbs and hair care -if you catch it in time. Hair loss that has been present for 3-5 years or more becomes very difficult and sometimes impossible to resolve. This type of hair loss typically presents as a receding hair line or thinning of hair along the part or crown of the head. It is generally caused by DHT, a form of testosterone that is also responsible for many prostate issues, which essentially ‘attacks’ hair follicles. Luckily, DHT can only function in low-oxygen environments, so by increasing circulation to the scalp we can prevent this type of hair loss.

Androgenic Alopecia: Saw Palmetto as an herbal supplement blocks DHT, and topical rosemary oil (like Prism’s Hair Growth Serum) blocks DHT directly in the scalp. 7 Star Treatments, like Prism’s Hair Restoration Treatment, also increase circulation to the scalp, blocking DHT.

The second most common form of hair loss is called ‘telogenic effluvium’, which literally means your hair is falling out. There’s no change in your hair follicles, simply too many of them are in the dormant vs growth stage. This is usually caused by hormonal stress like starting or stopping birth control, HRT, or hormone blockers, after birth, menopause, or even just a stressful time in your life. Yes, you can actually stress yourself out so much that your hair falls out! Besides tackling whatever caused this problem in the first place (getting acupuncture and a custom herbal formula to balance hormones and reduce stress, practicing mindfulness meditation or other stress-reduction techniques), the best thing you can do is to be gentle with your scalp to prevent as much hair loss as possible.

This also applies to hair loss caused by chemicals, heat, or other types of physical damage to the hair and hair follicles. This is most likely the case if you suddenly notice your hair refusing to grow more than a few inches long and then breaking off.

Care for Your Hair Follicles:

Beauty Routines:

  • Prevent sun damage: wear a hat or scarf to cover hair and scalp
  • Switch plastic brushes for a pure boar bristle brush or a wide tooth comb, only use on dry hair
  • Air dry hair or use a hair wrap instead of blow drying. Heat protectant sprays do not help because wetting hair before drying actually increases damage!
  • Wash hair only 1-3 times per week

Avoid drying, damaging, and toxic product ingredients (organic products generally do not contain these ingredients and are a good choice):

  • Silicone
  • Ethanol, isopropane, propanol or isopropyl alcohols (fatty alcohols like lauryl alcohol, cetyl alcohol, myristyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, cetearyl alcohol and behenyl alcohol are ok)
  • Aerosols (use pump sprays only)
  • Sulfates (organic coco-sulfates and sulfonates are gentler)
  • Parabens
  • Fragrances (essential oils are ok)
  • Zinc Pyrithione and Coal Tar (in dandruff shampoos, use an organic dandruff shampoo instead)
  • Sodium laurel/laureth sulfate (SLS), aka ammonium laurel sulfate, sodium dodecylsulfate, sulfuric acid, sodium salt sulfuric acid, A12-00356, Akyposal SDS, Aquarex ME, and Aquarex methyl
  • Proplyene glycol (PG), PEG, or Polyethylene
  • Salt Sprays (too drying)

Try these hair-safe products instead:

Avoid chemical and heat styling and harsh dyes. Check out salons that use organic products and ammonia and paraben-free dyes:

Hair breakage (and hair loss) can also be caused by malnutrition, either not getting enough nutrients your hair needs to grow, or something is preventing you from absorbing those nutrients. Most commonly this is due to anemia. Make sure to get checked out by a healthcare provider to determine the underlying cause!

Nutrition for Hair Health:

  • Hair and Skin from Nature’s Way
  • Hair, Skin, and Nail Support from Gaia Herbs
  • A prescription formula from Prism, tailored to your individual constitution
  • Omega Plus from Thorne, or:
    • Omega-3 from salmon, mackerel, tuna, white fish, sardines, walnuts, hemp seeds, flax seeds
  • Basic Nutrients (if you don’t need iron), Basic Nutrients IV (with iron), or Basic Prenatal from Thorne, or:
    • Vitamin C from oranges, kale, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, strawberries, grapefruit and kiwi.
    • vitamin D from halibut, mackerel, eel, salmon, whitefish, maitakes and portabellas.
    • Vitamin A from Sweet Potato, pumpkin, Carrots, Peaches, Kale
    • Vitamin E from Fish, Beans, Leafy Greens, Meat, Nuts and seeds, Whole grains
    • Biotin & B5 from chicken, avocado, legumes, nuts
    • Niacin from Fish, lean meats, Portabellas, Sunflower seeds, Avocado, Mushrooms, Tuna, Nuts
    • Iron from spinach, Swiss chard, collard greens, navy beans, black beans.
    • Zinc (especially with autoimmune alopecia) from oysters and other seafood, Whole grains, Legumes, Sunflower seeds, Pumpkin
    • Selenium from brazil nuts and other nuts and seeds, oysters, tuna, mushrooms
  • Collagen from bone broth; or boost your own collagen production with dark leafy greens and red fruits and veggies like cherries and beets
  • Lycopene from guava, papaya, grapefruit, asparagus, purple cabbage
  • Avoid Inflammatory foods like dairy, red meat, trans-fats (like margarine), gluten, alcohol, coffee, eggs, bananas, mango, pineapple, watermelon, nightshades (eggplant, paprika, peppers, potatoes, tomatillos, tomatoes), and soy.

If you’re not sure what kind of hair loss you’re experiencing, a dermatologist can examine your hair under a microscope and determine this for you. Beware the Rogaine they may prescribe, however, as it can often cause hair growth in unwanted places! Rosemary oil on the scalp (like Prism’s Hair Growth Serum) has been shown to be as effective as Rogaine and does not have this side effect.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

Prism Blog

The Story Behind Prism

The story behind the name:

I created Prism Integrative Acupuncture to fulfill a community need for transgender-inclusive, integrative hormone care. I focus in transgender wellness, but also in fertility, menopause, and other hormone-related issues. So, in thinking of a name, I wanted something that was at once clearly LGBTQ inclusive, but not exclusive to everyone else.

I like ‘Prism’ because it not only brings up a visual of a rainbow, and thus flags queer inclusive, but it also implies multifaceted-ness. One stream of light through a prism can create an entire rainbow.

I like this image both in reference to identity as a prism, but also to healing as a prism; a multifaceted, integrative process. I don’t just do acupuncture in my practice. I also prescribe herbs, discuss nutrition and lifestyle, supplements, interpret lab results, and confer with a patient’s western providers. Holistic medicine to me is not natural medicine only, it is integrative, it incorporates everything that can help a person so you can get the most well-rounded and effective care possible.

FullSizeRender

My story:

I’ve been passionate about herbal medicine for as long as I can remember; likely the result of being raised by a botanist with a deep love of plants. This passion sparked my interest in the holistic health field and was enough to get me interested in starting AIMC Berkeley’s rigorous 4-year Master of Science acupuncture program, where I could study not only the herbs I love but also acupuncture and so many other amazing healing modalities. Through the clinical program at AIMC Berkeley, I interned at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital and San Francisco’s Homeless Prenatal Program, as well as at AIMC’s school clinic, which allowed me to practice acupuncture in a variety of environments and with a broad spectrum of patients.

I went into the program with the intention of focusing in LGBTQ medicine, and this continues to be a driving focus of my practice, in addition to my specialty in hormone regulation. I love guiding patients through times of hormonal upheaval, allowing them to stay grounded despite the emotional turmoil that often accompanies times of illness. My favorite part of my job is watching people regain ownership of their healing process, reconnect with their bodies, and make positive changes in their lives.

In addition to maintaining a private practice, I am also a guest lecturer at AIMC Berkeley, teaching students about supporting transgender health and creating an LGBTQ-friendly practice, as part of their Masters curriculum. In my spare time, you can find me hiking or camping with my partner and our dogs.

Katrina Hanson MSOM DiplOM LAc
Founder, Owner, Acupuncturist


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


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Fertility and Pregnancy, hair loss, Menopause and Beyond, PCOS, Press, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Hair Brilliance with Chinese Medicine

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Join me for this wonderful class, in collaboration with Berkeley Community Acupuncture. We will make a hair growth serum together in class, which you will get to take home and use, you will also receive a BCA’s Glow Tea for hair and skin!
$40
At Berkeley Community Acupuncture, 2880 Sacramento St, Berkeley, CA.

Sign up!


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

 

Press, Prism Blog, Sex & Relationships

Acupressure for Good Sex

I love being mentioned by my fabulous community partners, and this one happens to be in an amazing article about acupressure for good sex, written by my colleague Denise, at Cicuto Acupuncture. Exerpt:

“While some of the points mentioned below are good for ‘seminal emission’ or ‘painful periods’ and may seem specific to men or women, most of the points help anyone of any gender, sexual orientation and whatever kind of relationship you’re in. Everyone has the acupuncture points I’ll be discussing here. (By the way, Prism Integrative Acupuncture has a great series of articles that are queer-friendly and sex-positive and we highly recommend checking them out.) If it seems like some of these conditions would prevent you from having good sex, doing acupressure on them can help change that. And talking about them with your partner(s) can help encourage good communication between you, which is not a bad thing in relationships.

You can use these points on yourself, using your fingers (or sex toys where applicable) for 30-60 seconds at a time on a daily basis. Or you can have a partner help you explore them, maybe with a favorite massage oil (like the Lovers’ Blend from Plants with Benefits Part II: Essential Oils for a Satisfying Sex Life) for the points on the abdomen and lower legs or perhaps a favorite lubricant, sex toy or tongue for the points in the genital area. Use the diagrams here to get acquainted with the location of the points. During sex, it’s ok to massage the general areas – the abdomen along the midline below the belly button, the lower legs from behind the ankle bone working your way up the leg; and the points in the genital area that feel good to you. (If you want a cheat sheet for the points, go to the end of the article and look for the fireworks picture.)”

Check out the full post on Acupressure for Good Sex here.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Transgender HRT: What are my options?

We ALL have the same hormones, just in different amounts and we USE different amounts of them too. Furthermore, we can change how our bodies use the hormones we already have. Every body makes progesterone from cholesterol, and that progesterone can turn into estrogen OR testosterone. The estrogen and testosterone in our bodies can also convert back and forth (estrogen to testosterone and vice versa). This is the reason you want to get your hormone dosages right: if you take too much, your body is just going to convert it into another hormone to maintain balance in your system. This could actually counter the desired effects of the hormone you are taking: too much estrogen in your system and your body will start converting it to testosterone, counteracting the changes you want to make.

Coming up with a plan for your body: There are many different options for transitioning, even when just using synthetic hormones. Most commonly, estrogen and spironolactone (a testosterone-blocker) are prescribed for trans women, and testosterone is prescribed for trans men. Testosterone is generally available in injectable or topical form, and estrogen is most commonly used in injectible form, though it is also available in pill form.
However, there are many other options as well. Progesterone helps to build tissue and can often be useful for developing breasts (used internally or externally with estrogen) or muscle tissue (used internally with testosterone). It can also help even out the emotions, preventing ups and downs that estrogen and testosterone can cause, as well as reducing side effects like bloating and water retention.
Aromatase is what turns testosterone into estrogen, so you can take extra aromatase instead of (or in addition to) taking estrogen. Likewise, you can take aromatase inhibitor to prevent that testosterone from turning into estrogen, instead of taking testosterone. There are many options for prescription hormones; it’s important to talk to your doctor about what will work best for your body.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

Acupuncture, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Herbs as Transition Alternative for Trans Kids and Teens

Growing up is always eventful and often tumultuous. For trans and gender non-conforming kids and teens, the stress and chaos can be magnified. Many studies have shown the importance of allowing trans kids to express their identities; it greatly reduces their suicide risk and imroves their lifetime mental and physical health. However, it can be difficult for parents to know how to approach this, especially when so many effects of prescription hormones are irreversible. Prism Integrative Acupuncture provides a safe, supportive space for kids and teens to explore their identies and start the process of transitioning in a mild and natural way, while allowing parents time to adjust to these changes. For gender non-conforming or gender variant kids who may not want to transition, this can be an especially important method of exploration. Whether your child is taking hormone blockers, HRT, or nothing at all, acupuncture and herbs can help them feel more comfortable in their bodies and identities while reducing their overall risks and long-term effects. We happily work with MDs, therapists, and other types of healthcare providers to give your child the most well-rounded care possible.

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Acupuncture and herbs may help to:

  • Connect gender creative/non-conforming kids with their bodies to reduce dysphoria
  • Create space to explore identity and gender expression without judgement or irreversible treatments
  • Reduce anxiety surrounding the menstrual cycle
  • Slow a heavy flow, ease cramps, reduce PMS and bloating
  • Prevent spotting between cycles, which can be a side effect of prescription progesterone or testosterone
  • Calm and reduce anxiety and depression, to help improve school attendance rates
  • Together with prescription progesterone, herbs may suppress the menses
  • “Test out” slight hormonal shifts without taking prescription hormones
    • Feminizing herbs may support slight breast growth
    • Masculinizing herbs may support some facial hair growth
    • Herbs can create a “feeling” of hormonal change in the body, which for some people is enough to reduce dysphoria
  • Smooth side effects of prescription hormones or hormone blockers
  • Reduce compression pain, back pain, chest tightness, and skin lesions from binding and gaffing
  • Reduce Acne
  • Reduce fatigue
  • Improve sleep
  • Benefit focus and concentration
  • Reduce stress and soothe anxiety
  • Lift depression
  • Boost your immune system to keep you healthy through the seasons

    All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


    Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

    Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

Acupuncture, Endometriosis, Fertility and Pregnancy, PCOS, Prism Blog, Sex & Relationships, Transgender Wellness

Acupuncture and Herbs for Reproductive Health and Fertility

Western treatments for reproductive health can often be frustrating and come with a lot of side effects. Acupuncture and herbs provide support to these western treatments to reduce side effects and improve success, as well as an alternative to more invasive western treatments. We happily work with MDs, fertility specialists, and other types of providers to provide you with the most well-rounded care possible.

Acupuncture and herbs may help to:

  • Restart the menses in amenorrhea
  • Slow a heavy flow
  • Ease cramps
  • Reduce PMS/PMDD and bloating
  • Prevent spotting between cycles
  • Inspire a more regular cycle
  • Regulate hormones and ease symptoms of PCOS
  • Ease symptoms of endometriosis and fibroids
  • Ease symptoms of fibrocystic breasts
  • Soothe vaginal dryness
  • Reduce pain with sex and increase orgasmic capacity
  • Improve prostate health and reduce swelling and inflammation
  • Increase erectile capacity
  • Improve ovulation frequency
  • Assist with restarting the menstrual cycle and promoting fertility after stopping testosterone
  • Assist with regulating hormones and improving fertility by soothing endocrine and autoimmune disorders, such as Hashimotos
  • Reduce some types of miscarriage risk
  • Ease morning sickness, edema, fatigue, and other symptoms of pregnancy
  • Reduce rates of some presentations of malpositioned fetuses
  • Prepare the body to start labor on time
  • Speed recover post labor or cesarean
  • Benefit lactation and reduce risk of mastitis
  • Soothe anxiety and post-partum depression to improve baby bonding

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All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.