Acupuncture, For Providers, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Yin and Yang; Masculine and Feminine

 

“Instead of saying that all gender is this or all gender is that, let’s recognize that the word gender has scores of meanings built into it. It’s an amalgamation of bodies, identities, and life experiences, subconscious urges, sensations, and behaviours, some of which develop organically, and others which are shaped by language and culture. Instead of saying that gender is any one single thing, let’s start describing it as a holistic experience.” –Kate Bornstein & S. Bear Bergman (Gender Outlaws)

Most diagnoses in Chinese medicine, represent the interaction between hot and cold, day and night, yin and yang, masculine and feminine. However, Chinese medicine’s outlook on these dualities is actually much more inclusive of LGBTQ identities when you look beyond this basic binary.

Yin and yang, though often associated with male and female, are more accurately represented by masculine and feminine. Masculinity and femininity are indeed seen as opposites, but they are also in a constant state of transformation from one into the other, and at each stage yang contains yin and yin contains yang.

Basic Principles of Yin & Yang/Masculinity and Femininity:

1. Masculinity and Femininity are opposites

2. Masculinity and Femininity are interdependent: There is always masculinity within Femininity and femininity within Masculinity

3. Masculinity and Femininity are mutually consuming and in a constant state of transformation of one into the other

In this way, masculinity and femininity cannot exist without both opposing each other and containing a piece of the other. Most people in discussing yin and yang theory today, and even most Chinese Medicine practitioners, only focus on the first principle, which alone can be used to reinforce our culture’s thinking of gender as binary. However, traditionally this medicine was much more inclusive of gender variations and spectrums!

Further Sources:
genderevolve.blogspot.com
acupuncturetoday.com


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


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For Providers, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

3 Ways for Healthcare Providers to Respect Diversity

  • Avoid making harmful assumptions about your patient. Whether you’re assuming they’re straight, cisgender, uneducated, dealing with addiction, or any number of things, any time you’re assuming rather than asking and listening to your patient you aren’t giving them the care they deserve. (For example, don’t ask a patient about her boyfriend when she hasn’t told you her sexuality or relationship status. In fact, personal questions like this are really only relevant if your patient brings them up first.)
  • Listen to your patient’s primary symptom and make sure to address it, regardless of other things you’ve learned (or assumed) about their health during the interview. Regardless of drug use, body size, relationship style, gender identity, mental illness, or any other issue, your patient won’t come back if you treat what you’ve decided is most pertinent to their health rather than what’s most important to them. This may seem obvious, but these kind of mistakes happen a lot. (For example, don’t treat a patient for weight loss who has come to see you for headaches!)
  • First and foremost we are here for our patients’ health and well-being. Never ask a patient about changing their lifestyle or identity. Furthermore, make sure you are not using up their valuable appointment time by trying to educate yourself. Look things up online on your own time if you need to learn more and save appointment time for your patient.
  • Provide gender neutral bathrooms. 
    • Who can benefit from gender neutral bathrooms? Parents with children of a different gender, people with an attendant of a different gender, trans* people, and individuals with non-normative gender presentations.
    • Why are gender neutral bathrooms important for trans* people? When a bathroom is gender neutral, trans* people can use it without risking harassment or violence from people who think they are in the “wrong” restroom. Access to gender neutral bathrooms also prevents UTIs and other health issues caused by “holding it” until a safer restroom is available.

All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

 

For Providers, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

How to Ask About Gender Pronouns for Healthcare Providers

  1. When asking about gender or pronouns, consider your intentions. Do you need to know a patient’s gender/sex-related medical history for your treatment? Or do you just need to know their preferred name and pronouns to develop practitioner-patient rapport? Knowing what your goals are will help you decide what and how to ask. Remember, curiosity is never an appropriate reason to ask personal questions of your patient.
  2.  Ideas for asking about gender or preferred pronouns include the following: “Which pronouns would you like me to use for you?” or “How would you like me to refer to you?” (This one is great if you’re not sure if you need to ask about pronouns. Patients can respond simply with “I go by Katie, not Katherine,” or, “Please call me Mrs. Smith.” Other patients may take this opportunity to share preferred pronouns or other information with you). Another good option is, “I like to ask all my patients which pronouns they prefer. Would you mind telling me yours?” Patients may feel more comfortable responding if they know you’re not singling them out.
  3. How do we know when we should ask patients questions about their identities? If you are just curious, don’t ask. There are many website available for you to educate yourself. Use patient time only to gather information relevant to their health concerns and goals. It is appropriate to ask how a patient would like you to refer to them, and what hormones they are taking because you need to know how to refer to them and medications may affect what herbs you prescribe. Though more sensitive, it can also be relevant to ask what your patient’s plans are for transitioning (or not transitioning) so that you can best support their goals.
  4. What’s the basic difference between gender and sex? Take a look at the “genderbread person” to learn the basic difference between sex and gender. As a generalization, gender is is your head; it’s how you identify. Sex is what the doctor decides you are when you’re born, based on your genitals at birth.
  5. The hardest part: Both gender and sex are social constructs! Your sex is decided based on your genitals at birth, which do not necessarily match with your chromosomes, what internal reproductive organs you have, what sex hormones or secondary sexual characteristics you will have, or even what your genitals will look like later in life. Most people like to think of sex as black and white (male, female, and nothing else), but this simply doesn’t match up with reality.

All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.