Acupuncture, For Providers, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Yin and Yang; Masculine and Feminine

 

“Instead of saying that all gender is this or all gender is that, let’s recognize that the word gender has scores of meanings built into it. It’s an amalgamation of bodies, identities, and life experiences, subconscious urges, sensations, and behaviours, some of which develop organically, and others which are shaped by language and culture. Instead of saying that gender is any one single thing, let’s start describing it as a holistic experience.” –Kate Bornstein & S. Bear Bergman (Gender Outlaws)

Most diagnoses in Chinese medicine, represent the interaction between hot and cold, day and night, yin and yang, masculine and feminine. However, Chinese medicine’s outlook on these dualities is actually much more inclusive of LGBTQ identities when you look beyond this basic binary.

Yin and yang, though often associated with male and female, are more accurately represented by masculine and feminine. Masculinity and femininity are indeed seen as opposites, but they are also in a constant state of transformation from one into the other, and at each stage yang contains yin and yin contains yang.

Basic Principles of Yin & Yang/Masculinity and Femininity:

1. Masculinity and Femininity are opposites

2. Masculinity and Femininity are interdependent: There is always masculinity within Femininity and femininity within Masculinity

3. Masculinity and Femininity are mutually consuming and in a constant state of transformation of one into the other

In this way, masculinity and femininity cannot exist without both opposing each other and containing a piece of the other. Most people in discussing yin and yang theory today, and even most Chinese Medicine practitioners, only focus on the first principle, which alone can be used to reinforce our culture’s thinking of gender as binary. However, traditionally this medicine was much more inclusive of gender variations and spectrums!

Further Sources:
genderevolve.blogspot.com
acupuncturetoday.com


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


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For Providers, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

How to Ask About Gender Pronouns for Healthcare Providers

  1. When asking about gender or pronouns, consider your intentions. Do you need to know a patient’s gender/sex-related medical history for your treatment? Or do you just need to know their preferred name and pronouns to develop practitioner-patient rapport? Knowing what your goals are will help you decide what and how to ask. Remember, curiosity is never an appropriate reason to ask personal questions of your patient.
  2.  Ideas for asking about gender or preferred pronouns include the following: “Which pronouns would you like me to use for you?” or “How would you like me to refer to you?” (This one is great if you’re not sure if you need to ask about pronouns. Patients can respond simply with “I go by Katie, not Katherine,” or, “Please call me Mrs. Smith.” Other patients may take this opportunity to share preferred pronouns or other information with you). Another good option is, “I like to ask all my patients which pronouns they prefer. Would you mind telling me yours?” Patients may feel more comfortable responding if they know you’re not singling them out.
  3. How do we know when we should ask patients questions about their identities? If you are just curious, don’t ask. There are many website available for you to educate yourself. Use patient time only to gather information relevant to their health concerns and goals. It is appropriate to ask how a patient would like you to refer to them, and what hormones they are taking because you need to know how to refer to them and medications may affect what herbs you prescribe. Though more sensitive, it can also be relevant to ask what your patient’s plans are for transitioning (or not transitioning) so that you can best support their goals.
  4. What’s the basic difference between gender and sex? Take a look at the “genderbread person” to learn the basic difference between sex and gender. As a generalization, gender is is your head; it’s how you identify. Sex is what the doctor decides you are when you’re born, based on your genitals at birth.
  5. The hardest part: Both gender and sex are social constructs! Your sex is decided based on your genitals at birth, which do not necessarily match with your chromosomes, what internal reproductive organs you have, what sex hormones or secondary sexual characteristics you will have, or even what your genitals will look like later in life. Most people like to think of sex as black and white (male, female, and nothing else), but this simply doesn’t match up with reality.

All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


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Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Chest Binding Safely: Save Your Back!

Interested in binding, or already binding? Here are some very important health tips that you need to know!:

  • Do NOT use an ace bandage or similar homemade device for binding. Wrapping around your chest several times can result in dangerously tight binding that cuts off circulation, breathing, tissue damage, and skin irritation. If you want to make a binder, cut off the top of some control top pantyhose and sew on some straps. This is much safer and still just as cheap!
  • NEVER sleep in a binder (unless you are in a place where it is unsafe for you to sleep without it). Don’t leave your binder on for more than 8 hours at a time. Your body needs time to stretch and breathe. Think about those pictures of women who wore corsets daily and how it changed the shape of their abdominal organs permanently. This can happen so a lesser extent with binding too and tissue damage caused by constant binding can make top surgery more difficult!
  • Wear the right size binder. Don’t wear a smaller size thinking it will be more effective, it won’t flatten your chest more effectively, it’ll just cause more damage to your ribs and make breathing more difficult.
  • If you wear a binder frequently, make sure its made of breathable fabric (not neoprene), or wear a tank top or apply cornstarch underneath it to prevent chafing and breaking out.
  • If possible, take a “day off” at least once a week. Wearing even a tight sports bra once a week instead of a binder can help take some of the pressure off of your ribs.
  • Go braless or wear a loose bra as much as possible. Actually bouncing your chest can help restore circulation and prevent tissue damage. Take your binder off as soon as you can, and spend a few minutes either jumping or just manually moving your chest. This can help prevent issues like breast cancer and tissue damage (and is even recommended for people who wear underwire bras regularly).
  • Binding can change breast tissue, potentially increasing chances of breast cancer. It is important to do regular self exams so you recognize any changes in your body right away. The most important thing is to notice what lumps are normal for you and which are abnormal, immovable, and/or don’t go away.
  • Give yourself chest massages (or get a loved one to do it for you!) to work out any tightness that wearing a binder causes. Pay special attention to the sides of your ribs, collar bone area, shoulders, and use a tennis ball (or two tennis balls taped together) on a wall or the floor to get the knots out of your back and between your scapula.
  • Buy at least two binders so that you can alternate between them. If you give them a day off to regain their shape they’ll last longer! Wash them in special detergent that keeps them stretchy too: you can find soaps for medical braces, swimsuits, or nylons that all work well for this.
  • If you are younger than 20, your body is still growing and changing and this makes binder safety even more important. Don’t wear a binder more than 3-4 times  a week. At younger ages you are more likely to cause dangerous changes to your ribcage and chest tissue by binding more frequently.

Resources for Buying a Binder:
This site has information on fitting, buying, and wearing binders
Low cost binders
T Kingdom
Underworks
Underworks swim binder
Binder reviews

Binder Alternatives:
Frog Bra Substitutes
Qwear sports bras


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


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Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

 

Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Herbs for Transitioning: The Basics

Herbs can be used for many aspects of transitioning: transitioning with herbs alone, switching from synthetic hormones to herbs to maintain secondary sex characteristics, and supporting the body with herbs and nutrition to counteract side effects of synthetic hormones.

The Basics:

It’s first important to take care of your body with proper nutrition so that you can handle the changes  and stress that will accompany transitioning. All hormones are made of fat, so it’s important to eat good fats (raw oils & omega 3s especially) to help your body form and transform those hormones, and also to coat your nerve cells (their myelin sheaths are also made of fat) to help you cope with stress and stay emotionally healthy. Fats form the boundaries of our cells–they keep out and let in what we want to–we need good fats in our bodies to have good boundaries physically and emotionally!

We ALL have the same hormones, just in different amounts and we USE different amounts of them too. Furthermore, we can change how our bodies use the hormones we already have. Every body makes progesterone from cholesterol, and that progesterone can turn into estrogen OR testosterone. The estrogen and testosterone in our bodies can also convert back and forth (estrogen to testosterone and vice versa). This is the reason you want to get your hormone dosages right: if you take too much, your body is just going to convert it into another hormone to maintain balance in your system. This could actually counter the desired effects of the hormone you are taking: too much estrogen in your system and your body will start converting it to testosterone, counteracting the changes you want to make.

Coming up with a plan for your body:

There are many different options for transitioning, even when just using synthetic hormones. Progesterone itself helps to build tissue and can often be useful for developing breasts (taken externally) or muscle tissue (taken internally). Aromatase is what turns testosterone into estrogen, so you can take extra aromatase instead of (or in addition to) taking estrogen. Likewise, you can take aromatase inhibitor to prevent that testosterone from turning into estrogen, instead of taking testosterone. There are many options for prescription hormones; it’s important to talk to your doctor about what will work best for your body.
For most people, herbs aren’t going to change your hormones drastically alone, so you might choose to start out taking synthetic hormones and, once you’ve achieved the effect you want, use herbs to lower your dose of synthetic hormones or switch to herbs entirely. Herbs can maintain the hormone levels and characteristics you’ve built up with synthetic hormones. This is a good alternative to the sometimes health damaging side effects of long-term synthetic hormone use.


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References include:
http://www.sfherbalist.com/holistic-health-for-transgender-gender-variant-folks/


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.