Acupuncture, Menopause and Beyond, Prism Blog, Surgical Recovery

10 Reasons LGBTQ Seniors Should Get Acupuncture

  1. LGBT older people face significant health disparities, “linked to a lifetime of stigma, discrimination, violence and victimization; higher poverty rates; a lack of access to LGBT-competent providers; and low rates of health insurance coverage” (Out & Visible). Therefore, LGBTQ older adults need even more access to healthcare.
  2. Acupuncture helps to protect the immune system and prevent the potentially dangerous infections that become more likely as we age.
  3. Acupuncture eases pain and arthritis as well as strengthening bones to prevent osteoporosis and injuries, so you can maintain mobility and reduce the need for surgeries and medications.
  4. Acupuncture lowers blood pressure and strengthens the circulatory system, preventing potentially life threatening cardiovascular events.
  5. LGBT elders “deal disproportionately with mental health concerns, which is a primary risk factor for social isolation” (Sage USA). Acupuncture reduces anxiety and depression, helps you to adapt constructively to change, and to move through grief.
  6. Acupuncture helps your body prepare for surgery and to heal faster after surgery, reducing complications and need for pain medications.
  7. Acupuncture does all of this without having to worry about drug-drug interactions!
  8. AIMC Berkeley is an LGBTQ safe space so you don’t have to worry about healthcare discrimination. “44% of transgender older people worry that their relationships with healthcare providers would be negatively affected if their gender identities were known, as opposed to 20% of LGB older people” (Autostraddle on LGBTQ Seniors).
  9. Treatment is determined based on the individual, not the illness. All the symptoms are seen in relation to each other leading to a unique treatment for each patient instead of cookie cutter prescriptions.
  10. You get more time with a practitioner than you would with an MD. With 60 minute appointments, Katrina can take time to really listen to you.

All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


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Acupuncture, For Providers, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Yin and Yang; Masculine and Feminine

 

“Instead of saying that all gender is this or all gender is that, let’s recognize that the word gender has scores of meanings built into it. It’s an amalgamation of bodies, identities, and life experiences, subconscious urges, sensations, and behaviours, some of which develop organically, and others which are shaped by language and culture. Instead of saying that gender is any one single thing, let’s start describing it as a holistic experience.” –Kate Bornstein & S. Bear Bergman (Gender Outlaws)

Most diagnoses in Chinese medicine, represent the interaction between hot and cold, day and night, yin and yang, masculine and feminine. However, Chinese medicine’s outlook on these dualities is actually much more inclusive of LGBTQ identities when you look beyond this basic binary.

Yin and yang, though often associated with male and female, are more accurately represented by masculine and feminine. Masculinity and femininity are indeed seen as opposites, but they are also in a constant state of transformation from one into the other, and at each stage yang contains yin and yin contains yang.

Basic Principles of Yin & Yang/Masculinity and Femininity:

1. Masculinity and Femininity are opposites

2. Masculinity and Femininity are interdependent: There is always masculinity within Femininity and femininity within Masculinity

3. Masculinity and Femininity are mutually consuming and in a constant state of transformation of one into the other

In this way, masculinity and femininity cannot exist without both opposing each other and containing a piece of the other. Most people in discussing yin and yang theory today, and even most Chinese Medicine practitioners, only focus on the first principle, which alone can be used to reinforce our culture’s thinking of gender as binary. However, traditionally this medicine was much more inclusive of gender variations and spectrums!

Further Sources:
genderevolve.blogspot.com
acupuncturetoday.com


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


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For Providers, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

3 Ways for Healthcare Providers to Respect Diversity

  • Avoid making harmful assumptions about your patient. Whether you’re assuming they’re straight, cisgender, uneducated, dealing with addiction, or any number of things, any time you’re assuming rather than asking and listening to your patient you aren’t giving them the care they deserve. (For example, don’t ask a patient about her boyfriend when she hasn’t told you her sexuality or relationship status. In fact, personal questions like this are really only relevant if your patient brings them up first.)
  • Listen to your patient’s primary symptom and make sure to address it, regardless of other things you’ve learned (or assumed) about their health during the interview. Regardless of drug use, body size, relationship style, gender identity, mental illness, or any other issue, your patient won’t come back if you treat what you’ve decided is most pertinent to their health rather than what’s most important to them. This may seem obvious, but these kind of mistakes happen a lot. (For example, don’t treat a patient for weight loss who has come to see you for headaches!)
  • First and foremost we are here for our patients’ health and well-being. Never ask a patient about changing their lifestyle or identity. Furthermore, make sure you are not using up their valuable appointment time by trying to educate yourself. Look things up online on your own time if you need to learn more and save appointment time for your patient.
  • Provide gender neutral bathrooms. 
    • Who can benefit from gender neutral bathrooms? Parents with children of a different gender, people with an attendant of a different gender, trans* people, and individuals with non-normative gender presentations.
    • Why are gender neutral bathrooms important for trans* people? When a bathroom is gender neutral, trans* people can use it without risking harassment or violence from people who think they are in the “wrong” restroom. Access to gender neutral bathrooms also prevents UTIs and other health issues caused by “holding it” until a safer restroom is available.

All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


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For Providers, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

How to Ask About Gender Pronouns for Healthcare Providers

  1. When asking about gender or pronouns, consider your intentions. Do you need to know a patient’s gender/sex-related medical history for your treatment? Or do you just need to know their preferred name and pronouns to develop practitioner-patient rapport? Knowing what your goals are will help you decide what and how to ask. Remember, curiosity is never an appropriate reason to ask personal questions of your patient.
  2.  Ideas for asking about gender or preferred pronouns include the following: “Which pronouns would you like me to use for you?” or “How would you like me to refer to you?” (This one is great if you’re not sure if you need to ask about pronouns. Patients can respond simply with “I go by Katie, not Katherine,” or, “Please call me Mrs. Smith.” Other patients may take this opportunity to share preferred pronouns or other information with you). Another good option is, “I like to ask all my patients which pronouns they prefer. Would you mind telling me yours?” Patients may feel more comfortable responding if they know you’re not singling them out.
  3. How do we know when we should ask patients questions about their identities? If you are just curious, don’t ask. There are many website available for you to educate yourself. Use patient time only to gather information relevant to their health concerns and goals. It is appropriate to ask how a patient would like you to refer to them, and what hormones they are taking because you need to know how to refer to them and medications may affect what herbs you prescribe. Though more sensitive, it can also be relevant to ask what your patient’s plans are for transitioning (or not transitioning) so that you can best support their goals.
  4. What’s the basic difference between gender and sex? Take a look at the “genderbread person” to learn the basic difference between sex and gender. As a generalization, gender is is your head; it’s how you identify. Sex is what the doctor decides you are when you’re born, based on your genitals at birth.
  5. The hardest part: Both gender and sex are social constructs! Your sex is decided based on your genitals at birth, which do not necessarily match with your chromosomes, what internal reproductive organs you have, what sex hormones or secondary sexual characteristics you will have, or even what your genitals will look like later in life. Most people like to think of sex as black and white (male, female, and nothing else), but this simply doesn’t match up with reality.

All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


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Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Chest Binding Safely: Save Your Back!

Interested in binding, or already binding? Here are some very important health tips that you need to know!:

  • Do NOT use an ace bandage or similar homemade device for binding. Wrapping around your chest several times can result in dangerously tight binding that cuts off circulation, breathing, tissue damage, and skin irritation. If you want to make a binder, cut off the top of some control top pantyhose and sew on some straps. This is much safer and still just as cheap!
  • NEVER sleep in a binder (unless you are in a place where it is unsafe for you to sleep without it). Don’t leave your binder on for more than 8 hours at a time. Your body needs time to stretch and breathe. Think about those pictures of women who wore corsets daily and how it changed the shape of their abdominal organs permanently. This can happen so a lesser extent with binding too and tissue damage caused by constant binding can make top surgery more difficult!
  • Wear the right size binder. Don’t wear a smaller size thinking it will be more effective, it won’t flatten your chest more effectively, it’ll just cause more damage to your ribs and make breathing more difficult.
  • If you wear a binder frequently, make sure its made of breathable fabric (not neoprene), or wear a tank top or apply cornstarch underneath it to prevent chafing and breaking out.
  • If possible, take a “day off” at least once a week. Wearing even a tight sports bra once a week instead of a binder can help take some of the pressure off of your ribs.
  • Go braless or wear a loose bra as much as possible. Actually bouncing your chest can help restore circulation and prevent tissue damage. Take your binder off as soon as you can, and spend a few minutes either jumping or just manually moving your chest. This can help prevent issues like breast cancer and tissue damage (and is even recommended for people who wear underwire bras regularly).
  • Binding can change breast tissue, potentially increasing chances of breast cancer. It is important to do regular self exams so you recognize any changes in your body right away. The most important thing is to notice what lumps are normal for you and which are abnormal, immovable, and/or don’t go away.
  • Give yourself chest massages (or get a loved one to do it for you!) to work out any tightness that wearing a binder causes. Pay special attention to the sides of your ribs, collar bone area, shoulders, and use a tennis ball (or two tennis balls taped together) on a wall or the floor to get the knots out of your back and between your scapula.
  • Buy at least two binders so that you can alternate between them. If you give them a day off to regain their shape they’ll last longer! Wash them in special detergent that keeps them stretchy too: you can find soaps for medical braces, swimsuits, or nylons that all work well for this.
  • If you are younger than 20, your body is still growing and changing and this makes binder safety even more important. Don’t wear a binder more than 3-4 times  a week. At younger ages you are more likely to cause dangerous changes to your ribcage and chest tissue by binding more frequently.

Resources for Buying a Binder:
This site has information on fitting, buying, and wearing binders
Low cost binders
T Kingdom
Underworks
Underworks swim binder
Binder reviews

Binder Alternatives:
Frog Bra Substitutes
Qwear sports bras


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

 

hair loss, Menopause and Beyond, PCOS, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

How Does Saw Palmetto Decrease Baldness?

Normally, hair follicles remain active for up to a decade, producing a long strand of 10 year old hair. In alopecia, however, follicles stop producing hair before the hair is long enough to even emerge from the skin. Male pattern baldness, or Androgenic Alopecia, is both genetically determined and influenced by hormones.

Genetics cause some people’s hair follicles to be more susceptible to DHT (dihidrotestosterone), which changes the growth phase of hair follicles. This gene can be present in any sex, but is only expressed when DHT, a form of testosterone, is present. Hence the name “male-pattern” baldness. This is the reason why many trans men develop this pattern of baldness while on T, and why this process of balding stops in most trans women once they start taking anti-androgens (like spironolactone).

Though we cannot change the gene, we can prevent testosterone from converting to DHT to stop this balding process. Testosterone converts to DHT via the enzyme 5-alpha-reductase. Research has shown that saw palmetto inhibits 5-alpha-reductase, preventing this pattern of baldness.


Saw palmetto is very effective for hair growthSaw palmetto together with the supplement beta-sitosterol has been shown to have a 60% effectiveness rate for hair loss reversal. In my experience this does not increase facial hair growth, however studies have shown inconclusive results about its effect on overall testosterone levels. It likely blocks aromatase, an enzyme which converts testosterone to estradiol, a major hormone involved in breast development. If you’re concerned about saw palmetto supplements increasing your testosterone levels, a good alternative is to use it topically. It has been used topically with similar effectiveness.

Saw palmetto also prevents the accumulation of DHT in the prostate, lowering the risk of prostate cancer. It acts on estrogen and progesterone receptors to lower the risk of breast cancer. It’s helpful for colds and coughs, sore throats, asthma, chronic bronchitis, chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and migraine headaches. It is also a diuretic (makes you pee more), a sedative, and an aphrodisiac, so be cautious if those are effect you do not want.

DO NOT take saw palmetto with spironolactone because they are both diuretics and could significantly lower your blood pressure or cause dehydration. People with bleeding disorders or who are taking anticoagulant or antiplatelet medications (“blood-thinners”) such as warfarin (Coumadin), aspirin, or clopidogrel (Plavix) should avoid taking saw palmetto unless under medical supervision. It should also be avoided at least two weeks before or after surgery. Saw palmetto may interact with other medicines, including anti-inflammatory drugs, blood pressure medications, birth control pills and antibiotics.


Another great herb for hair loss is Shou Wu. Shou Wu Pian (aka Fu Ti) is an ancient Chinese herb that increases hair growth. It is generally used for scalp hair growth, but in my experience it increases mustache growth as well. If increased facial hair would be a problem for you, you may not want to take this formula. It’s also important not to take this formula if you are already taking synthetic hormones or other medications as it can increase the strain on your liver.


More hair loss prevention
Massage daily with Rosemary hair oil
Topical borage seed oil works like Propecia to block androgen receptors in hair follicles
Teas of silica rich herbs like horsetail, oats, or nettles
Nourish your kidneys with asparagus, artichoke, celery, aduki beans, parsley
Using a plum blossom needle to stimulate hair growth.

Finally, to support your overall constitution and get treatments tailored specficially to your goals, come in for a treatment!


Where to find:

Shou Wu Pian (aka Fu Ti)

Saw Palmetto with Beta-Sitosterol

Topical Saw Palmetto

Read more


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.