hair loss, Menopause and Beyond, PCOS, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Stop Hair Loss in Its Tracks

I recently taught a workshop on healthy hair care and preventing hair loss and I just want to share a few tips from the class with you!

Hair loss can have several causes, from stress to genetics to autoimmune disorders. Some of these are easier to solve than others, but treating our hair (and bodies) well can help slow -and in some cases reverse- hair loss no matter what the cause.

Some amount of hair loss is a natural part of the hair cycle. It’s normal to lose between 50-100 hairs on days you don’t shower, and up to 200 hairs on days you do. Which should tell you right away that if you’re concerned about hair loss you should be showering less often!

At any given point, about 90% of your hair follicles should be in the active growing phase and 10% should be in the dormant or falling out stage. Hair loss can involve either an imbalance in the number of active vs inactive follicles, or a change in the growth of active follicles so that they no longer produce hair of the original color, length, or texture. If you’re concerned that you’re losing too much hair, take about 60 hairs between two fingers and gently pull. If you get more than 5-8 hairs you likely have an imbalance in the number of active vs inactive follicles.

The most common form of hair loss is also the most well-known. Commonly called ‘male-pattern baldness’ or androgenic alopecia, it actually occurs in all genders. While there is certainly a genetic component to this type of hair loss, it can also be mediated with herbs and hair care -if you catch it in time. Hair loss that has been present for 3-5 years or more becomes very difficult and sometimes impossible to resolve. This type of hair loss typically presents as a receding hair line or thinning of hair along the part or crown of the head. It is generally caused by DHT, a form of testosterone that is also responsible for many prostate issues, which essentially ‘attacks’ hair follicles. Luckily, DHT can only function in low-oxygen environments, so by increasing circulation to the scalp we can prevent this type of hair loss.

Androgenic Alopecia: Saw Palmetto as an herbal supplement blocks DHT, and topical rosemary oil (like Prism’s Hair Growth Serum) blocks DHT directly in the scalp. 7 Star Treatments, like Prism’s Hair Restoration Treatment, also increase circulation to the scalp, blocking DHT.

The second most common form of hair loss is called ‘telogenic effluvium’, which literally means your hair is falling out. There’s no change in your hair follicles, simply too many of them are in the dormant vs growth stage. This is usually caused by hormonal stress like starting or stopping birth control, HRT, or hormone blockers, after birth, menopause, or even just a stressful time in your life. Yes, you can actually stress yourself out so much that your hair falls out! Besides tackling whatever caused this problem in the first place (getting acupuncture and a custom herbal formula to balance hormones and reduce stress, practicing mindfulness meditation or other stress-reduction techniques), the best thing you can do is to be gentle with your scalp to prevent as much hair loss as possible.

This also applies to hair loss caused by chemicals, heat, or other types of physical damage to the hair and hair follicles. This is most likely the case if you suddenly notice your hair refusing to grow more than a few inches long and then breaking off.

Care for Your Hair Follicles:

Beauty Routines:

  • Prevent sun damage: wear a hat or scarf to cover hair and scalp
  • Switch plastic brushes for a pure boar bristle brush or a wide tooth comb, only use on dry hair
  • Air dry hair or use a hair wrap instead of blow drying. Heat protectant sprays do not help because wetting hair before drying actually increases damage!
  • Wash hair only 1-3 times per week

Avoid drying, damaging, and toxic product ingredients (organic products generally do not contain these ingredients and are a good choice):

  • Silicone
  • Ethanol, isopropane, propanol or isopropyl alcohols (fatty alcohols like lauryl alcohol, cetyl alcohol, myristyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, cetearyl alcohol and behenyl alcohol are ok)
  • Aerosols (use pump sprays only)
  • Sulfates (organic coco-sulfates and sulfonates are gentler)
  • Parabens
  • Fragrances (essential oils are ok)
  • Zinc Pyrithione and Coal Tar (in dandruff shampoos, use an organic dandruff shampoo instead)
  • Sodium laurel/laureth sulfate (SLS), aka ammonium laurel sulfate, sodium dodecylsulfate, sulfuric acid, sodium salt sulfuric acid, A12-00356, Akyposal SDS, Aquarex ME, and Aquarex methyl
  • Proplyene glycol (PG), PEG, or Polyethylene
  • Salt Sprays (too drying)

Try these hair-safe products instead:

Avoid chemical and heat styling and harsh dyes. Check out salons that use organic products and ammonia and paraben-free dyes:

Hair breakage (and hair loss) can also be caused by malnutrition, either not getting enough nutrients your hair needs to grow, or something is preventing you from absorbing those nutrients. Most commonly this is due to anemia. Make sure to get checked out by a healthcare provider to determine the underlying cause!

Nutrition for Hair Health:

  • Hair and Skin from Nature’s Way
  • Hair, Skin, and Nail Support from Gaia Herbs
  • A prescription formula from Prism, tailored to your individual constitution
  • Omega Plus from Thorne, or:
    • Omega-3 from salmon, mackerel, tuna, white fish, sardines, walnuts, hemp seeds, flax seeds
  • Basic Nutrients (if you don’t need iron), Basic Nutrients IV (with iron), or Basic Prenatal from Thorne, or:
    • Vitamin C from oranges, kale, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, strawberries, grapefruit and kiwi.
    • vitamin D from halibut, mackerel, eel, salmon, whitefish, maitakes and portabellas.
    • Vitamin A from Sweet Potato, pumpkin, Carrots, Peaches, Kale
    • Vitamin E from Fish, Beans, Leafy Greens, Meat, Nuts and seeds, Whole grains
    • Biotin & B5 from chicken, avocado, legumes, nuts
    • Niacin from Fish, lean meats, Portabellas, Sunflower seeds, Avocado, Mushrooms, Tuna, Nuts
    • Iron from spinach, Swiss chard, collard greens, navy beans, black beans.
    • Zinc (especially with autoimmune alopecia) from oysters and other seafood, Whole grains, Legumes, Sunflower seeds, Pumpkin
    • Selenium from brazil nuts and other nuts and seeds, oysters, tuna, mushrooms
  • Collagen from bone broth; or boost your own collagen production with dark leafy greens and red fruits and veggies like cherries and beets
  • Lycopene from guava, papaya, grapefruit, asparagus, purple cabbage
  • Avoid Inflammatory foods like dairy, red meat, trans-fats (like margarine), gluten, alcohol, coffee, eggs, bananas, mango, pineapple, watermelon, nightshades (eggplant, paprika, peppers, potatoes, tomatillos, tomatoes), and soy.

If you’re not sure what kind of hair loss you’re experiencing, a dermatologist can examine your hair under a microscope and determine this for you. Beware the Rogaine they may prescribe, however, as it can often cause hair growth in unwanted places! Rosemary oil on the scalp (like Prism’s Hair Growth Serum) has been shown to be as effective as Rogaine and does not have this side effect.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

The Feminizing Diet

This is a follow-up post to my post, “Nutritional Guidelines for Transgender Patients.” See the original post here. This article is an excerpt from my research paper, “Nutritional Guidelines for Transgender Patients,” which was written for practitioners of TCM to create holistic diets tailored to clients’ constitutions. It is not intended to function as medical advice. There are a few jewels tucked into this article for practitioners, if you don’t have an understanding of TCM theory you can skip over the italicized parts.


To start, proper general nutrition is important, including plenty of healthy fats, avoiding animal products raised with hormones and processed or refined foods, and adding more fresh fruits, vegetables, and high quality protein.

As long as there are not contraindications or food allergies, an estrogen and progesterone supportive diet (i.e. does not actually produce/mimic estrogen and progesterone but can help to support those hormones in your body) should be focused on ancient grains and cooked dark vegetables, and include cooked berries, eggs, dark legumes, micro-algaes, nuts and seeds, garlic, shiitake, and reishi.

This diet along with herbs and acupuncture can cause a slight elevation in estrogen levels and breast enlargement in some people. However, please understand that these diets alone will not have a significant effect. Since each individual has different goals, this diet can be adapted based on changes that each person wishes to make and any underlying conditions.

Estrogen & Progesterone Supportive Diet Suggestions

  1. Increase starchy vegetables, millet, barley, seaweed, micro-algaes, dark legumes, beets, kudzu, persimmon, cooked berries, bananas, watermelon, mollusks (limit mollusks when taking progesterone), pickled and fermented foods, eggs, and coconut milk.
  2. Grass-fed hormone-free organic milk and fermented/cultured dairy products are also a great addition.
  3. Limit meat to small amounts of duck, beef, pork, goose, rabbit, and organ meats.
  4. If not taking hormones, add raw dark fruits (blackberries, purple plums, blueberries, etc.), raw dark greens, raw bell peppers, and small amounts of real black licorice (avoid with high blood pressure, when taking spironolactone, or with hot flash or night sweat symptoms).
  5. If taking estrogen, add garlic, lemons and limes (avoid if taking progesterone), shiitake, and reishi. AVOID eating grapefruit or taking GSE with estrogen.
  6. If taking spironolactone, AVOID buchu, cleavers, dandelion, gravel root, horsetail, juniper, uva ursi, molasses, and radishes.

Yin:

Many, though by no means all, trans women taking estrogen and spironolactone have some degree of yin deficiency, and this diet can help to counteract this issue while still supporting transition goals. This is a generally mild and healthy diet safe for most people, however care should be taken in following this diet exclusively long term if yin deficiency is not present. Always talk to your healthcare provider when making dietary changes.

A yin nourishing diet should be based on millet, barley, teff, quinoa, amaranth, and other ancient grains (Pitchford, p. 65). Other appropriate yin foods that could be added to the diet include seaweed, micro-algaes, black beans, kidney beans, mung beans, sprouts, beets, string beans, kudzu (not with damp signs), persimmon, grapes, cooked berries, bananas, watermelon, dairy, eggs, clams, abalone, oysters (avoid mollusks when taking progesterone and with damp signs), and sardines (Pitchford, p. 65). Reduce meat -which is a more yang tonifying food- except for small amounts of yin and blood nourishing duck, beef, pork, goose, rabbit, and kidney (Pitchford, p. 65). Sour foods are beneficial because they tonify yin and move the blood (Caruso-Radin), which could be helpful to prevent blood clots, a common side effect of estrogen use,. Spices should mainly include milder white pepper, cilantro, and marjoram, which are yin spices (Pitchford, p. 62), rather than stronger yang spices like cayenne. When these foods are made into soups, stews, and congees they become even more yin tonifying.

Supporting Estrogen:

In designing a feminizing diet, it is necessary to think about not only the energetic and hormonal properties of foods, but also their safety for long term use. For example, eating mainly carbohydrates, starches, coffee, and soy can raise estrogen levels and lower testosterone levels (Duvall), but this can also potentially cause diabetes, hormone dependent cancers, heart palpitations, and other serious health consequences.

I would generally recommend that for those looking for natural sources of estrogen, there are many safer options than soy. For example, “flax contains substances called lignans, which have been shown to have estrogen-like qualities” (Wright & Morgenthaler). A few foods have small amounts of identical-to-human hormones [about 1-2% potency of human hormones] (Wright & Morgenthaler), including:  Rice, apples, date palm, pomegranate (estrone); and French bean seedlings (estradiol). Note that eating these foods alone will generally not be enough to noticeably increase estrogen levels.

For trans women not taking hormones, licorice could be added to the diet to increase estrogen, however it should not be taken with diuretics (such as spironolactone), by an individual with high blood pressure (Griffith, p. 345), or with symptoms of hot flashes and night sweats. The ipriflavone in soy, alfalfa, and propolis is additive when taken with estrogen (Gale Group), and should not be combined with estrogens (Gaby, p. 110), but may be useful for those not taking hormones, though only fermented soy such as tempeh should be consumed (to avoid the other detrimental effects of soy).

Supporting Progesterone:

Pregnenolone derived from diosgenin in wild yams is extracted in the body when combined with cholesterol heavy foods such as eggs, and is converted to either DHEA or progesterone (Bennett), which can balance high estrogen levels. This is known to cause breast enlargement in male assigned people (Griffith, p. 174-175), but because DHEA and progesterone can convert to either estrogen or testosterone in the body, they should not be used with synthetic hormones or without medical supervision.

Synthetic Estrogen and Food Interactions:

Trans women taking hormones should be aware that they can interact with nutrients in certain foods. Estrogen for example, has adverse interactions with the quercetin in grapefruit, which is also to a lesser extent in capers; onions; raw dark fruits like cranberries, black plums, blueberries, currants, and cherries; and raw kale, lettuce, asparagus, spinach, broccoli, and peppers (Kerns, 2014). These foods should be limited when taking estrogen and not eaten at the time of medication.

In addition to having adverse reactions with quercetin, synthetic estrogens deplete B6, which can be replaced by eating organ meats, brewer’s yeast, garlic, and whole potatoes (USDA). B6 smooths liver qi stagnation, clears heat, harmonizes wood and earth, and clears heat from the stomach and damp-heat from the gall bladder (Caruso-Radin), which can help ease negative effects of estrogen on the digestive system and emotional health.

Countering Estrogen Side Effects:

Estrogen can cause several side effects, such as circulation problems, blood clotting, and sometimes increased blood levels of cholesterol, all of which may be prevented with nutrition. Circulatory problems can be combated with the chlorophyll in dark leafy greens and micro-algaes (Balch, p.129). This can be further aided by the CoQ10 and B5 (converted to coenzyme-a, which works along with CoQ10) in organ meats, eggs, brewer’s yeast, avocado, and seeds, which together improve tissue oxygenation (Coffman). According to TCM, CoQ10 and coenzyme-a relieve liver qi stagnation, clear heat, and tonify the spleen (Caruso-Radin), perhaps allowing the spleen to create qi and the liver to move qi to prevent stagnation that could lead to blood clots and other circulatory problems.

Shiitake and reishi prevent hypertension, heart disease, and cholesterol problems (Midnight). The Vitamin C and other antioxidants in a diet full of fermented foods and a variety of fruits and vegetables prevents blood clotting (Midnight), and also clears heat, resolves toxins, and calms the shen (Caruso-Radin), potentially minimizing the toxicity of synthetic hormones and easing emotional imbalances caused by introducing new hormones to the system. Nuts and seeds, especially coconut milk, walnuts and sunflower seeds which contain both essential fatty acids and vitamin E (USDA), should also be consumed to help the body to manufacture hormones like estrogen (Balch, p. 454), and to replenish vitamin E that is depleted by synthetic estrogen (Pitchford, p. 397).

Anyone taking estrogen should include lemons or limes (avoid with progesterone), spinach, and other leafy greens to detox the liver (Duvall). Brussels sprouts and broccoli in particular also contain phyto-estrogens (Duvall), so are an especially good choice. Monitor your hormone levels with a doctor when doing a liver detox to ensure that you are maintaining the appropriate amounts for your body.

Countering Spironolactone Side Effects:

Spironolactone is the most commonly used androgen blocker in the United States. It was originally developed as a potassium sparing diuretic and therefore should not be combined with diuretic herbs like buchu, cleavers, dandelion, gravel root, horsetail, or juniper; or with foods with a lot of magnesium and potassium (Gaby, p. 243), like molasses, kelp, chocolate, bananas, or radishes (USDA), since those minerals are not excreted as easily with spironolactone use.

(Providers: Magnesium astringes yin, suppresses yang, and calms shen (Caruso-Radin), so the fact that spironolactone causes the body to retain magnesium may explain why spironolactone has a yin tonifying anti-androgenic effect. Potassium tonifies the spleen, drains damp, and clears heat (Caruso-Radin), accounting for the diuretic effects of spironolactone.)

Anyone taking spironolactone should supplement with organ meats, spinach, or asparagus which provides the folate that can be depleted from spironolactone use (Gaby, p. 243). Folate nourishes the blood, harmonizes the liver, and calms the shen (Caruso-Radin), which could potentially ease some of the emotional side effects of hormones.

Salt is also depleted and should be supplemented via cheese and pickled or fermented vegetables (UCSF). Salt tonifies the liver and kidney and astringes jing (Caruso-Radin), which can all be damaged by longer-term synthetic hormone use. A low-salt diet combined with spironolactone can cause low blood pressure. Blood pressure should be monitored frequently while taking spironolactone to ensure it is not too low, especially if you tend to experience low blood pressure.

Countering Progesterone Side Effects:

Progesterone, when taken internally, increases vitamin A. From a TCM standpoint, vitamin A tonifies the blood and jing and clears deficiency heat and stagnation, accounting for progesterone’s ability to nourish yin to counterbalance estrogen.

Progesterone also increases folate, zinc, and magnesium (Gaby), so these items should not be supplemented, however, this most likely does not apply to foods containing those nutrients. This does mean that the folate depleted by spironolactone would be balanced by progesterone and magnesium would be even more increased so should definitely not be supplemented when taking both of these medications.

Summary:

Overall, a diet for trans women could focus on ancient grains, especially millet and barley, and cooked Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and other dark greens. It should also include micro-algaes, dark legumes, cooked berries, eggs, coconut milk, grass-fed organic hormone-free dairy, walnuts, sunflower seeds, garlic, shiitake, and reishi.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.


ix Taken as a supplement, cream, or suppository. Not usually used in food due to toxicity, though it may be found in Eden Food’s “Wild Yam Soba.”

Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

The Masculinizing Diet

This is a follow-up post to my post, “Nutritional Guidelines for Transgender Patients.” See the original post here. This article is an excerpt from my research paper, “Nutritional Guidelines for Transgender Patients,” which was written for practitioners of TCM who can use this information as part of a holistic diet tailored to client’s constitutions. It is not intended to function as medical advice. Because every body can respond differently, before beginning or changing your diet always consult a healthcare provider. I have included a few gems in here for practitioners, if you don’t have an understanding of TCM theory you may skip over the italicized portions.


To start, proper general nutrition is important, including plenty of healthy fats, avoiding animal products raised with hormones and processed or refined foods, and adding more fresh fruits, vegetables, and high quality protein.

As long as there are not contraindications based on your underlying constitution, a testosterone supportive diet should be high fiber, low carb and include a lot of vegetables and a moderate amount of protein.

This diet along with herbs and acupuncture can cause a slight elevation in testosterone levels in some people. However, please note that these diets alone will not have a significant effect.

Table 2: Trans-masculine Dietary Suggestions

  1. Limit carbohydrates -especially starches- and increase fiber, fruits and vegetables.
  2. Add white mushrooms, bee pollen, royal jelly, and/or celery. Meat in general is more yang, but especially poultry, lamb, wild game, tuna, lobster, salmon, and shrimp are beneficial for a masculinizing diet.
  3. If taking testosterone, add brazil nuts and garlic, and avoid salt.

Yang:
A mildly yang nourishing diet is generally safe for most people however care should be taken in following this diet long term if yang deficiency is not present. It is important to note that trans men who have just begun taking testosterone often have some degree of yin deficiency, and this diet would be inappropriate in that case. Always talk to your healthcare provider when making dietary changes.

A yang tonifying diet includes more warming, sweet, pungent foods (Pitchford, p. 54), and avoiding raw and cold temperature foods (Pitchford, p. 95). Meat, especially poultry, lamb, wild game, tuna, lobster, salmon, and shrimp are especially good, but if the client experiences side effects from the testosterone, especially high red blood cell counts, meat should be cut down. Once taking testosterone, a yang tonifying diet would have to be greatly modified and monitored by a TCM practitioner or discontinued since testosterone tends to create more yin deficiency and blood heat rather than yang deficiency.

Lowering Estrogen:

A high fiber diet can decrease blood estrogen levels by removing estrogen from the body before it can be reabsorbed in the bowel (Griffith, p. 158). Carbohydrates and especially starches should be limited as well because high blood sugar and associated high insulin levels can in turn raise estrogen levels. In addition, trans men should always avoid animal products raised on hormones (Cole and Han, p.75), since these hormones are estrogenic.

Anyone taking hormones should include sulfurous foods like garlic, dark leafy greens, and egg yolks, as well as lemons and limes, shiitake, reishi, dark leafy greens and cruciferous vegetables (cooked only if taking estrogens), to detox the body. Sulfur gives the liver the ability to get rid of toxins such as synthetic hormones (Duvall), tonifies the kidneys, warms yang, and benefits the skin (Caruso-Radin). Cruciferous vegetables, except for brussels sprouts and broccoli, stimulate testosterone production and flush out estrogen (Prodragonist), and celery has androgen like properties (Midnight). Lignans in sesame and whole grains -also in flax but that has an estrogenic effect- (Petersen), interfere with the enzymes that are involved with the production of estrogen (Duvall). Methionine, which aids estrogen breakdown (Marz, p.85), is found in many animal products; especially tuna, cheese, salmon, wild game, and shrimp, and also nuts, especially walnuts (Marz, p. 86), so protein should come especially from these sources. It is also important to balance excess methionine with glycine from bone broths (Caruso-Radin).

White button mushrooms also prevent testosterone to estrogen conversion (Prodragonist), and bee pollen and royal jelly may increase testosterone levels (Balch, p. 457). Acidophilus in lactofermented foods breaks down metabolites of estrogen (Balch, p. 588), as well as soothing the digestive tract which can be irritated by hormones. DHEA -via combining wild yam and cholesterol as described above is known to cause acne, hair loss, facial hair, and deepening voice in female assigned people (Griffith, p. 158-159), reminiscent of many of the effects of testosterone, and these “side effects” could be used to the client’s benefit. However, as DHEA can be converted to either estrogen or testosterone, it is important to monitor your hormone levels with a doctor when using this method.

Countering Side Effects:

Side effects from testosterone include high blood pressure, high red blood cell count, and high cholesterol. High blood pressure may be prevented somewhat by following a low salt, sugar, and caffeine diet, including avoiding foods with preservatives, aged meat, anchovies, avocado, fava beans, and pickled herring (Balch, p. 438). High blood pressure, if it occurs, can also be eased by selenium (Balch, p. 437), which is found in brewer’s yeast, brazil nuts, pork, eggs, liver, lamb, beef, tuna, and lobster (USDA). Selenium astringes yin, anchors yang, and calms shen (Caruso-Radin), allowing it to calm liver yang rising causing hypertension. High cholesterol, another potential side effect of testosterone use, can be helped with apples, cold water fish, dried beans, garlic, olive oil, carrot juice, and limiting sugars and oils to only unrefined cold or expeller pressed oils and naturally sweet foods like fruit (Balch, p. 442).

Vitamin C in citrus and brightly colored fruits and vegetables boosts testosterone levels, clears heat, stops bleeding, resolves toxins, and calms the shen (Caruso-Radin), potentially helping to stop the menses, prevent toxicity from hormone use, and ease initial mood swings as well as heat side effects, such as hypertension, hives, hot flashes, and acne. Vitamin E can also help reduce hot flashes common with starting testosterone (Balch, p. 512). Vitamin E is found in green vegetables, milk, liver, and nuts, and nourishes the blood and yang from a TCM perspective (Caruso-Radin), potentially countering liver yang rising due to deficient heat. Vitamin A, such as that in grass-fed whole dairy, bright orange and yellow fruits and vegetables and dark leafy greens (Caruso-Radin), is somewhat depleted by testosterone use (Gaby, p.175), so these foods should be increased in the diet.

Overall, a simple high fiber, low carb, moderate protein diet with plenty of vegetables should be followed for trans men. Good proteins to include are tuna, cheese, salmon, wild game, shrimp, lamb, and raw unsalted walnuts, peanuts, and almonds. White button mushrooms, bee pollen, royal jelly, brightly colored fruits and vegetables, lactoferments, beans, cruciferous vegetables, celery, sesame seeds, tomatoes, pears, and apples are great additional foods. If taking testosterone, clients should follow a low salt diet and add brazil nuts and garlic.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Nutrition for Transitioning

This article is an excerpt from my research paper, “Nutritional Guidelines for Transgender Patients.” It is not intended to function as medical advice. Before beginning or changing your diet, always consult a healthcare provider.

Nutrition is an important part of Chinese Medicine that should not be overlooked especially when working with clients taking hormones and other medications, as those medications can have significant effects on a client’s digestive system and nutrient absorption.

For any client, it is most important to start with a basic healthy diet. Clients should try to avoid animal products raised with hormones, salty and fried foods, sugar, white flour, chocolate, processed or refined foods, soy, alcohol, and caffeine, and to add more fresh fruits and vegetables (Gladstar, p. 84-85). Clients should also try to avoid too much raw or cold food and drinking with meals; and focus on chewing thoroughly, eating slowly, and eating a variety of foods (Caruso-Radin). Eating plenty of healthy fats helps to support mental health since fats form the myelin sheaths that coat nerve and brain cells, allowing them to function more effectively (Midnight). Fats also support the body in making hormones, many of which are derived from cholesterol (Midnight). Starting with these guidelines, specific nutrients may be used to support synthetic hormones and create a new healthy balance based on the client’s goals. Nutrition is extremely important for anyone’s health, but is especially valuable in a transitioning process which can cause both bodily and mental stress. Creating a diet that fits a client’s goals can ensure more compliance as well as enhance the work being done with other modalities.

Read more here on masculinizing and feminizing specific diets!

References:

American Pregnancy Association. Folic Acid. June 2014. Retrieved from americanpregnancy.org/pregnancy-health/folic-acid/

Balch, Phyllis and Balch, James. Prescription for Nutritional Healing, 3rd edition. Avery, Penguin Putnam Inc, New York. 2000.

Bennett, Alan. How to Convert Cholesterol to Pregnenolone. Livestrong: Health. January 28, 2015. Retrieved from livestrong.com/article/72359-convert-cholesterol-pregnenolone

Caruso-Radin, David. Nutrition East and West. Course at AIMC Berkeley, Winter 2015.

Coffman, Melodie Anne. Which Foods are Rich in CoQ10? Livestrong. January 10, 2014. Retrieved from livestrong.com/article/256149-what-foods-are-rich-in-coq10/

Cole, B. and Luna Han, editors. Freeing Ourselves: A Guide to Health and Self Love for Brown Bois. 2011.

Earthangel, Reverend Doctor. The Importance of a Healthy Diet. The House of Sissify: The Herbal Encyclopedia. 2005. Retrieved from sissify.com/feminization-hormones/healthy-diet

Erickson-Schroth, Laura. Trans Bodies, Trans Selves: A Resource for the Transgender Community. Oxford University Press, New York, NY. 2014.

Gaby, Alan R. and The Healthnotes Medical Team, editors. A-Z Guide to Drug-Herb-Vitamin Interactions, 2nd edition. Three Rivers Press of Random House, NY. 2006.

The Gale Group. Ipriflavone. AltMD: Gale Cengage Learning. 2008. Retrieved from altmd.com/Articles/Ipriflavone–Encyclopedia-of-Alternative-Medicine

Gladstar, Rosemary. Herbal Healing for Women. Fireside of Simon & Schuster Inc, NY. 1993.

Griffith, H. Winter. Vitamins, Herbs, Minerals and Supplements: The Complete Guide, revised edition. New York, NY. 1988.

Kerns, Michelle. Foods with the Highest Content of Quercetin. Livestrong: Food and Drink. June 23, 2014. Retrieved from livestrong.com/article/301326-foods-with-the-highest-content- of-quercetin/

Kerns, Michelle. Foods Containing L-Carnitine. Livestrong: Food and Drink. August 25, 2015. Retrieved from livestrong.com/article/22647-foods-containing-l-carnitine

Marz, Russel B. Medical Nutrition from Marz, 2nd ed. mni-Press, U.S. 1999.

Midnight, Dori. Holistic Health for Transgender & Gender Variant Folks. Ohlone Herbal Center, Research Papers. December 28th, 2009. Retrieved from ohlonecenter.org/research- papers/holistic-health-for-transgender-gender-variant-folks/

Petersen, Julia, Johanna Dwyer, Herman Adlercreutz, Augustin Scalbert, Paul Jacques, and Marjorie McCullough. Dietary Lignans: Physiology and Potential for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction. Nutrition Review, 68 (10), p. 571-603. October, 2010. Retrieved from ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2951311

Pitchford, Paul. Healing with Whole Foods: Asian Traditions in Modern Nutrition 3rd edition. North Atlantic Books, Berkeley, CA. 2002.

The Prodragonist. More Queer Herbs (Masculine). July 24, 2013. Retrieved from belladonnaquixote.wordpress.com/2013/07/24/more-queer-herbs-masculine/comment- page-1

Renee, Janet. List of Foods that Contain Glutamine. Livestrong: Food and Drink. January 9, 2014. Retrieved from livestrong.com/article/249890-list-of-foods-that-contain-glutamine

Transgender Nutrition Considerations. February 27, 2013. Retrieved from transidentified.com/2013/02/27/transgender-nutrition-considerations

UCSF Medical Center. Guidelines for a Low Sodium Diet. University of California San Francisco. Retrieved from ucsfhealth.org/education/guidelines_for_a_low_sodium_diet

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 27. Agicultural Research Service. Retrieved from ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/nutrients

ivCan include a variety of identities that do not fit into the categories of “man” and “woman.” Some terms are gender neutral, genderqueer, non-binary gender, gender non-conforming, and gender fluid, among others. Sometimes people with these identities also consider themselves trans and may or may not undergo medical transition.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


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Prism Blog, Sex & Relationships

14 Foods to Soothe Herpes Outbreaks

Two amino acids have a significant impact on both herpes simplex (mouth or genital herpes) and herpes zoster (shingles).

Lysine reduces the strength of a herpes outbreak, while Arginine can actually increase the intensity and duration of the outbreak. You can take lysine as a supplement to prevent outbreak, or eat foods containing lysine and avoid foods containing arginine, before and during the outbreak to shorten the duration.

You can also take the formula Long Dan Xie Gan Tang for herpes outbreaks either externally or internally. It usually takes 2-3 days for the formula to work (edited based on Liana’s comment).

Foods with Lysine: add before/during outbreak (in order from most lysine to least)

  • Fish
  • Chicken
  • Beef
  • Goat milk
  • Cow milk
  • Lamb
  • Pork
  • Cheese
  • Beans (especially mung beans, lima beans, and soy beans)
  • Cottage cheese
  • Brewer’s yeast
  • Sprouts
  • Crustaceans
  • Eggs

Foods with Arginine: avoid! (in order from most arginine to least)

  • Hazel nuts
  • Brazil nuts
  • Peanuts & peanut butter
  • Walnuts
  • Almonds
  • Cocoa powder
  • Sesame
  • Cashews
  • Carob powder
  • Coconut
  • Pistachios
  • Buckwheat flour
  • Garbanzo beans or chickpeas
  • Brown rice
  • Pecans
  • Whole wheat bread
  • Oatmeal
  • Raisins
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Corn

All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.